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#1 NVScouter

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:06 PM

Does anybody have a DB scale/chart for different callibers?I was loading up a couple hundred rounds of 22-250 last night and am picking up a 204 to field test side by side. I want to know how other calibers fall into the range.Whatcha got?

#2 BullsEye

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:41 PM

DB Scale? What are you measuring? DB usually stands for decibels. :roflmao3[1]: didn't read the entire title.you can get a db meter for 30 bucks at radio shack or pick one up on the net http://www.virtualvi...medium=shoppingI would be curious as to what levels the rifles are hitting. I am assuming they are pushing 110db easily.

#3 BullsEye

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 12:59 PM

I did a quick search on the net and came up with this. from (http://www.freeheari...firenoise.shtml)It is scary if you consider that 130db of noise can cause many illnesses and even death."Noise is suspected of causing a number of adverse physiologic effects, ranging from hearing loss to myocardial infarction. Studies conducted to date suggest there is little risk of permanent hearing damage from noise below 70 decibels, which is the level typically found in a car or office setting. A jackhammer operates at about 100 decibels, and a jet taking off generates about 130 decibels. Other health end points studied have included elevated blood pressure, angina pectoris, ischemic heart disease, use of antihypertensive or cardiovascular drugs, and consultation with a doctor (for unspecified reasons)."Below we have listed critical data describing peak sound pressure levels produced by firearms used in shooting and hunting sports. A serious byproduct of this exposure is sensory-neural hearing loss, which cannot be restored to normal. With the introduction of MUZZLE BRAKES and PORTING, the risks of hearing loss dramatically increase. Use this chart as a reference guide for promoting the need of using adequate hearing protection.NotationsKeep in mind that conversational speech is approximately 60-65 dB, and the threshold of pain is considered to be 140 dB. According to Dr. William Clark, Ph.D. senior research scientist in charge of the NOISE LABORATORY at the Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, the damage caused by one shot from a .357 magnum pistol, which can expose a shooter to 165 dB for 2msec, is equivalent to over 40 hours in a noisy workplace. Dr. Krammer, Ph.D., Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana has documented the following pressure levels.Table 1. SHOTGUN NOISE DATA (DECIBEL AVERAGES).410 Bore 28" barrel 150dB26" barrel 150.25dB18 _" barrel 156.30dB20 Gauge 28" barrel 152.50dB22" barrel 154.75dB12 Gauge 28" barrel 151.50dB26" barrel 156.10dB18 _" barrel 161.50dB Dr. Krammer continues to say that shotgun noise averaged slightly more that 150dB. This is approximately 14dB beyond the threshold of pain, and more than sufficient to cause sudden hearing loss with complications.Table 2. CENTERFIRE RIFLE DATA.223, 55GR. Commercial load 18 _" barrel 155.5dB.243 in 22" barrel 155.9dB.30-30 in 20" barrel 156.0dB7mm Magnum in 20" barrel 157.5dB.308 in 24" barrel 156.2dB.30-06 in 24" barrel 158.5dB.30-06 in 18 _" barrel 163.2dB.375 — 18" barrel with muzzle brake 170 dBKrammer adds that sound pressure levels for the various pistols and ammunition tested yielded an average mean of 157.5 dB, which is greater than those previously shown for shotgun and rifle noise levels. There was also a greater range, from 152.4dB to 164.5dB, representing 12 dB difference, or more than 10 time as much acoustic energy for the top end of the pistol spectrum. It should be noticed that this figure of 164.5 dB approaches the practical limit of impulse noise measurement capability inherent in most modern sound level meters.Table 3. CENTERFIRE PISTOL DATA.25 ACP 155.0 dB.32 LONG 152.4 dB.32 ACP 153.5 dB.380 157.7 dB9mm 159.8 dB.38 S&W 153.5 dB.38 Spl 156.3 dB.357 Magnum 164.3 dB.41 Magnum 163.2 dB.44 Spl 155.9 dB.45 ACP 157.0 dB.45 COLT 154.7 dBThe above averages are for all types of ammunition used in these firearms, and should be considered fairly representative. No wonder we hear numerous reports about hearing loss as a result of firearms including acoustic traumas that take hearing completely as a result of one shot. Imagine what the noise levels must be when we incorporate muzzle brakes or porting into firearms, or have a gun explode near the ear due to malfunction.OUR WARNING IS SIMPLE AND IS IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF EACH SHOOTER. AS THE SOUND PRESSURES INCREASE, SO DOES THE RISK OF PERMANENT HEARING LOSS. IF YOU INCORPORATE A PROCEDURE INTO YOUR SHOOTING THAT INCREASES THE SOUND LEVEL, YOU ALSO INCREASE THE RISK OF HEARING LOSS TO YOURSELF AND POSSIBLY THOSE WHO STAND NEAR YOU. BE SURE TO USE ADEQUATE EAR PROTECTION WHEN USING A FIREARM AND BE CAREFUL OF THOSE NEARBY. LAWSUITS HAVE ALREADY BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR GUNFIRE NOISE THAT HAS RESULTED IN HEARING LOSS. ALWAYS CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL AUDIOLOGIST, OTOLOGIST, OR OTOLARYNGOLOGIST WITH YOUR HEARING PROBLEMS. Hearing loss is not fun and can be prevented.Compliments of www.earinc.com

#4 NVScouter

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:07 PM

Great info! I think I have a DB scale around someplace in the shop. All that needs is the lower end, like 22LR/Mag, 17HMR, 22Hornet.I wear a hearing aid in my left ear with 60% hearing loss and 40%in my right from the military. Certain sounds cause extreme pain since I dont have protection inside my ear canal anymore they shoot straight to my brain. I also am trying to keep what I have left. I also like the 17HMR's noise levels for critters, seems like they pop out faster/dont run with the quiter rifle. When I'm shooting at 300yards + with the 17HMR they dont move unless I blow up thier buddy!

#5 Braz

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:40 PM

Read that above as a warning to all. DO NOT shoot without hearing protection. At any time. If you are going hunting, wear an amplified hearing protector. Believe me, you don't want to loose your hearing. I wear hearing aids in both ears. Without them, I have a difficult time with conversation. It isn't fun! And, oh yea, the aids I wear, not the fanciest or most expensive, still cost about $4500. Yep, that's right $4500. You can buy a lot of fancy electronic hearing proctectors for that kinda money.

#6 NVScouter

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:09 PM

I hear ya Braz. My last one cost the tax payers almost $10K...and still sucked!Last pair of sunglasses I lost because I kept moving my Mickey Mouse ears on/off while blowing up ground squirrels.I forgot to add. I'm 33 years old.

#7 Fjold

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 06:31 PM

I use ear plugs or my Peltors when I'm out varmint and predator shooting from stands or set ups. The only time I don't use them is stalking big game.

#8 fakawee

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 07:28 PM

Anyone who has a muzzle brake on their rifles should definitely wear some kind of hearing protection. I recently got my .223 back from my gunsmith who installed a custom made muzzle brake and a few other things. After shooting/sighting it back in at the range with hearing protection on I forgot how loud my rifle had become. The following weekend I went down to the desert and took a shot at a Jack. That one shot was so instantaneously painful that I almost dropped the rifle! I couldn't believe how loud it was. My left ear still rings to this day and it's been almost a month now that I've been wearing a foam ear plug in that ear hoping it will get better. It probably won't! I'm definitely saving for those in electronic hearing protectors that go inside the ears for the fall hunting season!

#9 Cranky Farmer

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 08:13 PM

So basically all firearms are loud!

#10 Rimrock

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 09:28 PM

I am old. I wear hearing aids. I started shooting when I was young and dumb (dumber)and didn't think much about hearing protection. I am paying for it now so I try to protect what little I have left.




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