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affordable sxs shotgun?


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#1 clampdaddy

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 07:21 PM

I've been thinking of getting a new sxs shotgun. The ones I really like cost way to much so I'm looking in the 1,500 dollar and below range. I don't like any of the russian imports, the stoeger feels good to be but that big blocky forearm just doesn't look like a slim upland hunting gun should. So far I really like the Dehaan SO. They're basicly a cz bobwhite made by Huglu, but Dehaan orders them with a few differences to meet his specs, tunes them up, and gives them a thourough impection before they let them out of thier shop. Basicly I want a 12ga, dual triggers, straight english or rounded pistol grip, with a slender forearm. Barrel length can be 26 or 28 inches and I don't care if it has ejectors or extractors. I've checked a few other companies like tristar, fabarm, and charles daly but most of them only have single triggers. Hatfield and Bernadelli make some beutiful pieces but I couldn't find a price listing (they looked pretty expencive). Does anyone have any suggestions?
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#2 rr762mmfmj

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:13 PM

Take a peek over here Shotgun World Shotguns is what they do there. Lots of info and owner input on the forum.For upland bird hunting may I suggest the following? Ditch the 12 gague, opt for a 20 or 28, with a 26" barrel and screw in chokes. Lighter and quicker handling is the way to go here. I have been using a Browning Citori 20/26" since 1980. It sure was pretty back then when I took it out of the box. Now it looks like I used it to beat the Quail to death with, I must have fallen down once or twice bird hunting in the past 27 years. But it it is as tight and in perfect working order now as it was in 1980.By the way, I think dual triggers will prove to be a hindrance when upland bird hunting. you have enough to think about during the three seconds you have to spot the flushing bird you just heard, mount the shotgun, clear your background of hunting Buddy's you don't want to shoot today, then take the shot, and maybe a follow up shot, on a second bird, where you will have another three seconds to do it all over again. Heck, there have been times I couldn't get my safety off cause I pushed it so quick and hard it got stuck in the barrel select notch. Simpler is better when playing with guns. Just my thousand dead quail worth of advice. YMMV

#3 clampdaddy

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:57 PM

Thanks for the advice 762. It's funny how different hunters who are after the same game can have totaly different ideas on what the perfect gun would be. :smiley-funny-post-sign: I grew up shooting an old double triggered stevens 20ga so I'm just used to the double triggers. On flushing birds the double trigger worked great for me because the front trigger fired the modified barrel for the close shot and if I missed the second trigger fired the full choke barrel. I never cared for saftey/selectors because like you (and probably most other single trigger double gun shooters) I've missed an opertunity or two because I locked up the saftey by getting it caught in between barrels. How come that only happens when your hunting with a few partners, the bird flushes your way, nobody else has a shot, the big rooster flys off without a single shot going off, and then your hunting buddys ask "why the hell didn't you shoot?!" :signlol2iu: I think that if I were useing this rig as mostly a quail gun I'd definitley get it in 20ga but I like the extra pop of a 12 for late season pheasants. Then again my old 20 didn't chamber 3" shells. I've been thinking about possibly getting a 16 ga but I'll have to check the local stores to see how available the ammo is and how much it costs. I'll probably end up with a 12 though. Dad shot an Ithica 12ga and I always thought it was the best pheasant gun on the planet. Wish I could find one like it at a reasonable price.
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.

#4 rr762mmfmj

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 06:09 AM

I've missed an opportunity or two because I locked up the safety by getting it caught in between barrels

Why does that bird seemingly hover or otherwise appear to be the largest, slowest bird you have ever pointed your shotgun at? My 20 is 3", so I use # 4's or # 6's for Pheasant, no problem. I also have a couple of 16's a Browning Sweet 16 that was my dad's, I never shoot it and a Remington 1100 that I keep in NY for deer hunting, that shotgun has a scope on it and I just shoot slugs through it. I do believe the 16 is making a slight comeback, you can buy them new from most manufactures now. The 16 is nice but some are a big as a 12. Unless I was getting a fantastic deal on a 16(one of mine was given to me, the other I paid $150) I would just get the 20.

#5 clampdaddy

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 06:07 PM

Why does that bird seemingly hover or otherwise appear to be the largest, slowest bird you have ever pointed your shotgun at?

I know exacty what you mean. You raise your gun and admire the cream puff shot presentation that a big fat rooster is handing you, while thinking "this is to sweet, you're rideing home in the back of my vest sucker!" only to get one of these :eck05: as he makes it to some property that you don't have permission to hunt. :lol: :pirashoot: :smiley-funny-post-sign: Every type of scattergun has a trait that will eventually cause the same senario. Useually when it happens with a pump or auto someone forgot to jack a round into the chamber. At least with a double you can lie and say that it was the gun that's messed up, "I can't belive this dog poop. This thing's going to the gunsmith on monday!" :signlol2iu: but when you open the bolt on the empty chamber of a three shooter there's no side steppin' the jokes and jeers you're about to hear from the guys that you are kicking weeds with. :doh[1]:Out of curiosity, what chokes do you normally use? It seems like in most magazines alot of writers like open chokes for all upland game. I have always been a fan of really tight chokes. Heck, I do most of my pheasant, dove, and crow shooting with a turkey choke. I don't hunt with a dog so I want to hammer them good and hard (or miss clean) because chaseing down a crippled pheasant in tall alfalfa is no fun......it's realy fun to watch someone else do it though. I've never hunted quail (can you believe that?) but I know by observing the way they flush and duck back into cover very quickley that a less restrictive choke is definitley the way to go.
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.

#6 rr762mmfmj

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 07:43 PM

As far as chokes; Opening day I use Skeet as my first shot, usually my bottom barrel, IC for my second. As the season progresses and the dumb ones have been eliminated, I usually change to IC first then Mod for the follow up. That changes with the location, especially if I get a mid season hunt on virgin private property, then I am back to the opening day set up. Thats usually my plan any way, but the extra chokes, including Full, are always in my bag. If you use tighter chokes, you will either have to give the bird some flight time to put a little distance between you and it, and with Quail, they rarely fly strait for very long, then you loose the shot due to some obstruction, or you hit it and spend an hour locating it. Plan B would be to just shoot and watch the puff of feathers as you totally destroy dinner. Quail are way smaller than pheasant, you can't just lay into them with 1 1/2 OZ # 6" and expect to have anything but a ruined bird.Was the Shotgun forum any help?

#7 clampdaddy

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 08:04 PM

Yes. They have a whole forum on the DeHaan shotguns that I've been considering. I posted some of my questions over there. When I put up my avatar over there it came up huge and I don't know how to shrink it down, I'm just waiting for someone to say something about it. :smiley-funny-post-sign:
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.

#8 Shoot-it

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 05:51 PM

What helped me a lot was shooting skeet. Like some off you know it makes you swing your gun to the target fast. I like to maintain a lead fire follow threw . We need to go out to the rooster club clamp and kill some clays .It's a lot of fun.

#9 rr762mmfmj

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 07:11 PM

You are probably right. I shoot skeet at the air base here. I have to say, I suck. I'm the guy you want to bird hunt with, but I just can't get serious with the clays. Last week I shot my best with my 1100, 26" IC. First round, 19, second and third rounds 22. The big difference was, that in the second and third rounds, I was smoking a cigar and holding it in my left hand while shooting. I think the added weight out front helped my swing and follow through. What do you think?

#10 clampdaddy

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 08:11 PM

What helped me a lot was shooting skeet. Like some off you know it makes you swing your gun to the target fast. I like to maintain a lead fire follow threw . We need to go out to the rooster club clamp and kill some clays .It's a lot of fun.

Sounds like fun. I've only shot informal clay at the ranch, never at a real skeet/trap range. I do most of my practiceing on crows. :good:
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#11 lilwes278

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Posted 17 August 2007 - 09:46 PM

Come on Matt, who are you kidding? There's no pheasants out in that area any more!!! :signlol2iu: Why there are still crows hanging around I have no idea... :rofl2:
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#12 clampdaddy

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:33 AM

That aint the only ranch I can hunt. I do my pheasant hunting at another relatives ranch in Elnido. The first saturday of pheasant season was always our yearly family reunion. I don't know how much longer that will last though. Alot of the sugar beet and cotton fields are being replaced with almond orchards. But it was pretty amazing when I was a kid.
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.

#13 Shoot-it

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 09:52 AM

Come on Matt, who are you kidding? There's no pheasants out in that area any more!!! :signs1111cr: Why there are still crows hanging around I have no idea... :)

You got that right it's because farmers are to good keeping there borders sprayed . One time I released 15 farm raised pheasants I found one plucked clean from a hawk that was because he was just standing there in the middle of the Field . Then my dumb dog at the time ran one down killed it. rr762 you sound like a fun guy to shoot a round of skeet with. I just go out and have fun 19 not bad any little thing will make you miss stopping your swing lifting your head after the shot . I shot a 25 once got a 24 but thats was it.Taking a shot of brandy helps on a cold day too :504: that's what I was told ... :014:

#14 clampdaddy

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 09:29 PM

The phesants have the deck stacked againced them. Crows and magpies rob thier nests, feral cats and coyotes get alot of them after they're hatched. Hawks don't mess around when it comes to killing pheasants either. The number of hawks in the valley nowadays is pretty crazy. Seems like when I was a kid you'd see one now and then but now I see them everywhere. It's funny how attempts to protect one animal always end up with another one getting the shaft. Today people cringe at the thought of shooting a bird of prey but once upon a time there used to be bounties on certain raptors. The gamebird and hawk situation we have is just like the deer and mountain lion situation we have here in our great state.
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.




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