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RIFLE CAMO TIPS


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#1 CA Desert Dog

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 07:31 PM

Camo It !Have you ever been hunting with a buddy and seen bright sunlight reflect off of that nice, blued rifle barrel of his? Coyotes and other critters are easily attracted and tipped off by a multitude of clues. Why give them even more of an edge? Why not camo your rifle (and other gear) and eliminate the possibility of attracting an animals attention therefore possibly blowing your stand? WHAT! Paint my rifle? To some of you the thought of painting that nifty rifle is totally out of the question. Personally, my rifles are hunting tools and as far as I?m concerned, stealth is of primary importance. If you agree, the process is very easy so let?s get started. (Remember that if you ever want to strip the camo, it is not difficult either.)PreparationChoose the rifle you wish to camo, make certain it is unloaded and clean it thoroughly. I usually begin with a wipe-down of degreaser such as Smart & Final?s liquid degreaser. It is not a petroleum distillate product but is strong and removes oils, grease, wax and grunge. Next, I wipe the entire rifle down with alcohol and a clean shop towel. After the project piece is all cleaned up, it?s time to mask off portions that you do not want to be painted. I very carefully mask out the scope lenses and numerical areas on the scope. I also stuff a ball of paper towel down the muzzle a hair. Sometimes I mask a section of the bolt and sometimes I don?t. Everything else gets paint.At this stage, depending upon the actual condition of your rifle, you may choose to lightly sand the stock and metal parts. I have only sanded one of my rifles prior to camoing because it was really tired. The rest were just cleaned and painted. I figured that since they were not sanded, if I ever did want to remove the paint from the stock and metal, the project wouldn?t be too difficult. Even without sanding, the paint on my rifles (and my rig) has held up very well. What You?ll Need (Main materials list is at end of Page 2) Go to Ace hardware or any major hardware store and pick up three cans of DuPont Krylon camouflage spray paint. There are three colors available, tan, dark green and dark brown. In addition, pick up a can of flat black. All are truly ?flat? and do not reflect light. Take a walk around your back yard or anyplace where there is a variety of foliage and pick several stalks of each type you can find. You?ll be using these for spray ?masks? so choose the patterns that most mimic the area you?ll be hunting. Pick enough so that you can rotate them and let the paint dry on them before using them as a mask again. Be sure to keep the leaves on the small side. The whole idea is to break up the lines of your rifle. Hang Em? HighThe next thing you?ll need to do is suspend the rifle at a comfortable painting height. I usually use a strong, fine wire through the sling stud in the butt of the stock and suspend the rifle muzzle down. Now I slip on the rubber gloves and give the rifle a final alcohol rub-down. We are now ready to begin painting.General Painting Tips Plan your project in settled, dry weather. An ambient temperature of at least 70 degrees is most desirable. If you can, set-up and paint in direct sunlight for maximum paint drying speed. (Krylon dries very fast, especially the flat camo type you?ll be painting with). Always use long, sweeping bursts of paint and strive for multiple thin coats. Allow a few minutes of drying time here and there and don?t try for maximum coverage right away.Begin The Games! I usually start off with a dark color and simply spray the entire project alternating the dark colors to build some material (paint) on the rifle. I allow some drying time and then I begin to spray some typical military type camp patterns and outlining them with contrasting colors. Don?t try for any particular repeated patterns. Be as irregular as possible and don?t repeat a pattern or a color scheme next to each other. Just keep doing that until you have the rifle covered with wild patterns. I usually stripe the barrel in multi-colors to break up it outline. Let the project dry for about 15 minutes. Using The MasksNow comes the fun part. Pick up one of your prized, leaf laden twigs and hold it right against the rifle. Choose a color of paint that contrasts the predominant background color of where you have laid up the mask and fire a sweeping burst of paint. Move the mask and repeat. Change masks, colors and locations and continue to paint. After a short while, you?ll see things coming together nicely. Now you can begin to make color adjustments to match the rifle to the hunting area. More tan for desert, more green for field. Do fine highlights with little touches of the flat black paint. This is all fun and the results you get will be great. There is no way you can screw this up. When you are satisfied, let things dry for one hour before handling. Pull off your masking tape, remove barrel plug and go hunting!Materials List Krylon Spray Paint (Camo brown, camo green, camo tan, flat black)One roll of 1? masking tapeStrong degreaser/cleaner (Simple Green, Smart & Final degreaser)AlcoholRubber glovesStrong Monel wire or similar for hanging rifle Clean clothsPosted ImageRed?s Help LineIf you have questions, call me 714 401 5876

#2 CA Desert Dog

CA Desert Dog

    Big Shooter

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Posted 29 November 2005 - 07:21 PM

It is tuff sometimes to paint up a new rifle but when yoin the field and practically invisible, it's worth it.




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