Jump to content


Photo

Stock Bending


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 25 July 2012 - 02:50 PM

I finally finished my stock bending fixture a while back.

A friend needed a Parker stock bent up and I needed to bend the Parker Repro 28g/.410 down.

So we got together for a little stock bending party a few weeks ago.

Here's the basic setup. We did the original Parker first. Triggerguard was removed. The gun had 3 1/4" of drop at the heel!
Posted Image


Once the gun was delicately clamped in the fixture, the wrist was wrapped with cotton rags and soaked in oil. It was continuously dowsed in oil at the wrist and foil protected what was not covered by the rags.
Posted Image


The first bend was fully a 1/2" after cooling and released. Very little springback. The gun had 2 3/4" drop at the heel now. We were so thrilled we didn't break the stock. The upper tang did look like it was digging into the stock a bit and we disassembled the gun and cleared the wood a bit to relieve the pressure. We then decided another 1/4" was necessary. Posted Image So, back in the fixture the gun went and we did another round on it. We also took out any cast and brought it to zero cast. Once cooled and released we were at 2 1/2" exactly. Fully 3/4" of bend in two bends! No cracks.
Posted Image
_________________________



Next, my Repro was up. It's a straight grip stock.

In the fixture, clamped up.
Posted Image

I bent the stock 1/4" at the heel, down.

A friend had bent it down about 3/8" a year ago, but it came back to about 1/4" bend. It was still too high for me and I had shot it for over a year and still missed high consistantly unless I buried my cheek unnaturally. With the new drop, it feels very much like guns I shoot well. I've shot the gun since bending it and it's about as perfect a fit for me as I could ask.

I'm pretty thrilled to have bent these two guns successfully. Posted Image
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird

#2 dangerranger

dangerranger

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 776 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Coarsegold, the exact center of CA
  • Interests:I am a shooter first and then a hunter. I shoot competitively, most recently in the American Single Shot Association. I have also shot Cowboy action, Silhoettes,etc.. I like to build guns as a hobby.

Posted 25 July 2012 - 06:31 PM

Great pics! Ive never seen how its done before. DR

#3 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 25 July 2012 - 08:03 PM

DR,
That's just one way to bend a stock. It seems to be the most popular among gunsmiths to use heat lamps and some kind of oil with rags to hold it against the stock.

But another way is similar but slightly different in that the source of the heat is a big torch. Up north of you in Ione, there's an Englishman named Dale Tate that uses a torch to heat the oil soaked rags. My friend in those pix above had Dale bend one of his Parkers and he tells of huge volumes of smoke pouring out of the shop when Dale does it, all the while with a big cigar in the corner of his mouth and talking and heating away. Pretty funny story to hear it told by my friend.

Another way I've seen pix of and some explanation of, was a rig where a large heated vat of linseed oil, located above the stock fixture, has a pipe and spigot to apply a constant flow of heated oil on the wrist of the stock. The fixture had a drain path and recovery tank. But it was pretty messy according to the smith that uses it.

I had wanted to build a fixture ever since I had seen pix of one. Over the years I've had a number of guns that I could have shot better or kept instead of selling if I had bent them.

But it's not all a bed of roses either. The third stock I bent did crack. It was my brother in law's sidelock Spanish sxs 20g. It had the grain in the wrist of the pistol gripped stock slightly angled and that was just enough to start the crack. It's a pretty small crack, but it was sobering after the great success of the first two.
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird

#4 KNOCKED UP

KNOCKED UP

    Big Kahuna

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,702 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brentwood california (The nothern ca. one)
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing, archery,Reloading.
    Harley Davidson Motorcycles, and good people
    RETIRED

Posted 26 July 2012 - 04:49 AM

I am impressed, I had no idea that you could do that. But then, I have lead a sheltered life.
Tom

Life on earth is temporary, Choose your destiny Wisely.

#5 modoc squeek shooter

modoc squeek shooter

    Big Shooter

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,689 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis Creek, CA
  • Interests:Hunting, shooting, guns, and saddles,
    self appointed GURU of squeek shooting in Modoc County

Posted 26 July 2012 - 06:37 AM

I am impressed. I think Tom and I were under the same rock, I also didn't know you could do that. Ed

#6 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 26 July 2012 - 07:54 AM

There's some basic information on why a shotgun stock needs to fit at this site. http://www.sidebysid...ng_article.html

But basically, it boils down to proper alignment of the eye with the barrels/sighting plane and proper height above the sighting plane, then length of pull (LOP)

The link below is to the best book I've seen on the topic of gunfitting. It's only 100 pages, but you'll know more about shotgun fit than nearly every gunsmith and shooting instructor you're likely to meet, after reading it.

http://www.amazon.co...michael yardley
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird

#7 KNOCKED UP

KNOCKED UP

    Big Kahuna

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,702 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brentwood california (The nothern ca. one)
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing, archery,Reloading.
    Harley Davidson Motorcycles, and good people
    RETIRED

Posted 26 July 2012 - 12:41 PM

I knew there was a good reason that I hang around on this site.
There is so much to learn, and I am getting a good education here.
Tom

Life on earth is temporary, Choose your destiny Wisely.

#8 ShooterJohn

ShooterJohn

    Admin

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern, CA
  • Interests:Hunting, shooting sports and fishing.

Posted 26 July 2012 - 01:01 PM

I had the stocks bent on two of my Perazzi's and I couldn't watch I was sure they break. But they still fit good so I guess it worked. My doubles gun used to bloody my cheek after some of the 500 double shoots. After they fixed them neither caused a problem again. But it's one operation I just couldn't bring myself to do Chuck. That's a pretty sweet jig you built yourself. You should get a sign made up, "Stocks broken for free!" Not broken ones we charge for. :lol:

Time waits for no one--
treasure every moment you have.


#9 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 26 July 2012 - 01:43 PM

I like it John. I'm going to use that line. :D
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird

#10 dangerranger

dangerranger

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 776 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Coarsegold, the exact center of CA
  • Interests:I am a shooter first and then a hunter. I shoot competitively, most recently in the American Single Shot Association. I have also shot Cowboy action, Silhoettes,etc.. I like to build guns as a hobby.

Posted 26 July 2012 - 08:40 PM

When I first got into CAS shooting I bought a Bakail SXS but it was a very poor fit. The American model for these guns must have been Chuck Conors or Wilt Chamborland! So I took it to several gunsmiths and the universal answer was "that cheap gun isn't worth my time to fit." So I tried the trap clubs and got pretty much the same answer. I did meet one guy who showed me a couple of things I could do to help. It was too long, But in the wrist. So I took out 1/2" from there. then I took another 1/2" off the butt. That got me down to 13 1/4" LOP. I then added a recoil pad and again cut off of the butt end. At some point Ive gotten the pitch in the neg and am too high at the comb. To fix the pitch I put a wedge under the pad but it still shoots high. I did get it to the point that I could hit the close targets required by CAS standards so Ive left it alone. But Id like to finish it one day. The thought is Id need to sand off some of the comb off But I'm not very good at just taking a little. The way I'm looking at it, bending would fix both the pitch and comb problems at the same time. Does that sound right to you? Here's a couple of pics of the offender.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#11 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 26 July 2012 - 09:21 PM

Certainly bending it down will drop the point of impact (POI). But I think the easiest solution is to use a wood rasp to plane a 1/8" off comb at a time and then shoot it on a pattern board.
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird

#12 DirtyDave

DirtyDave

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,168 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Colony, TX

Posted 26 July 2012 - 10:19 PM

hmmm, I might have to stop by and see you Chuck
Hic Ego Statio

#13 Bennie

Bennie

    Big Shooter

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,906 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yuba City, CA
  • Interests:Hunting, Fishing, Shooting.

Posted 27 July 2012 - 10:28 AM

Nice job bending the stocks. The fit of a shotgun is the most important thing about any shotgun in my books. I have only had one that truly fit and gave it to my brother. Worst firearm mistake I ever made. Wish I still had it. Did not miss very often with it.
Raith Heryford's Guide Service  Salmon, Trout & Steel Head | Striper, Sturgeon & Shad | Duck & Goose HuntingYuba /Sutter Northern CaliforniaCALL 530-870-2697 or emailQuit blowing on the Fur and get to the Hide.

#14 clampdaddy

clampdaddy

    Chief Feathercloud

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,058 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hilmar, Ca.
  • Interests:Shooting, Hunting, Reloading, Antique Tractors, Clampin', and Relaxing

Posted 03 August 2012 - 07:30 PM

That's great!
My guns are mine, they aren't for sale, and I only give guns to people that I really like. So I guess the government is **** out of luck.

#15 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,050 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:32 AM

I don't buy many new shotguns each year. Most of the guns I buy are vintage guns or used , probably one or two a year. Virtually all are side by side doubles. So given the nature of a sxs converging barrels for regulation, the first shots fired from my guns are always at a pattern board. With lower quality doubleguns, there is increased probability of improper regulation.

But the most common issue for single barrel guns (autos,pumps,etc.), or any other shotgun, is gun fit. Old vintage guns often have too much drop on the comb for modern shooting style. Some modern gunmakers will make the comb too high. Add to all this the fact that every shooter is built differently and you can see that a proper fit is about as likely as finding a new girlfriend. The closer you are to "normal", the more likely you'll find an off the shelf gun to fit you. Extremes of body characteristics like obesity, tall, short, etc, will often find it hard to find a gun off the shelf that has a proper fit.
It's not about how many, it's about how.
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly dog or gun

Maintain a balance of nature, use a beautiful gun when shooting a beautiful bird




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users