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Berger VLD Hunting


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#1 Desert Fox

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 07:07 PM

This is in response to the question from a thread started by left2fsh before it got side track regarding the use of the Berger bullet for hunting. I feel like I owed it to him to elaborate further and to share my experience with this bullet for both target and hunting use.

Berger bullets were originally designed as a target bullet. It didn't take long however before hunter started using them for hunting . Berger realized this and started making the hunting version of the bullet. They did it by reducing the jacket thickness to facilitate expansion. The profile however remain the same as that of the target bullet. Thus one can to substitute either bullet without changing loading data.

Berger is very accurate bullet! Others might think otherwise. But this due to the lack of understanding of the bullet design.

Berger bullet has longer than normal nose radius therefore has longer profile that necessitate faster twist to stabilize. Unlike other major manufacturer of bullets like Sierra, Nosler and Speer, which designed their bullet with tangent ogival nose, Berger chose to have the secant ogive instead. This nose design is much more efficient in slicing through air as it travels towards the target, which is very important for long distance shooting. The problem however with this type of nose profile is that it is very sensitive to seating depth. Rifle chambered specifically to shoot VLD bullet will have to be throated to match the nose profile. You can make it to shoot on your rifle! but it will be a tough proposition, requiring a lot of testing and experimenting. Berger addressed this issue by coming up with a hybrid bullet, combining the best of both design.

As a hunting bullet, Berger is no different than any other cup and core swaged type bullet. Use it inappropriately and you'll have a mess in your hand. Understand it's limitation, and you've got yourself a superb bullet, that will deliver it's payload at considerable distance accurately and efficiently.DF
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#2 Karl

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 02:31 AM

I have seen a couple of deer taken with Berger bullets and they were very effective on deer. They are supposed to detonate after penetrating two-three inches dumping all there energy inside the animal and loosing up to eighty-five percent of its mass.
DesertFox your bullet performed flawlessly on your Texas Buck!
Very nice shooting! thank you for your report.

Karl
Karl

#3 ehd

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 05:16 AM

I use the Berger in 55 grain for coyotes. Very nice accurate bullet., also I use a 69 grain in the 243.

#4 Desert Fox

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 08:50 AM

I have seen a couple of deer taken with Berger bullets and they were very effective on deer. They are supposed to detonate after penetrating two-three inches dumping all there energy inside the animal and loosing up to eighty-five percent of its mass.


Karl,

Berger remind me of the Nosler Ballistic Tip when it first came out. Lots of report of bullet failure initially coming from hunters who had used them which necessitated Nosler to make improvement on the bullet. Not that there's something wrong with the earlier Ballistic Tip. It is a case of the company failure to educate and informed the masses of the proper use of their products. Nosler finally got the message. Not only that they made improvement on the jacket design, they also asked Rick Jamison to write an article on the no.4 Nosler Manual titled "When to use Partition and When to use Ballistic Tip".

I bought 5 boxes of those 150 grain, 7MM in the red and green box, 100 count bullet for my 280 Remington in 1990, from a local gun store here in Rancho who went out of business. I finally used the last of it just about two year ago. I made my first 600+ yards kill with the 150 grain BT in my 280 Remington. The deer dropped as if it was hit by lightning. I also killed a small buck with it at 250 yards with the same result.

Cup and core swage bullet can not withstand high velocity impact on a close range shot. It can be very deadly however at around 1200 to 1800 ft/sec impact velocity. Deer and smaller thin skinned games will be the ideal use for these bullet. Don't use them on bigger and tougher games and you'll be fine.
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#5 lif2fsh

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 05:03 PM

Thanks, Desert Fox.
Your information is really appreciated.




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