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Cleaning Shotgun?


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#1 True2ThySelf

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:09 AM

I have always cleaned the shotgun after use but it takes me 1-2 hours. How often do you guys clean your guns, how do you do it and how long does it take you.The steps I take are the following:Take off the barrelPut solvent on a patch and run it down the barrelSet it aside and repeat for second gunClean the insides of both gunsGo back to the barrels and run another patch with solventUse the tornado brush 4-5 timesRun more solvent patchesRun 2-3 dry patchesRinse and repeat with solvent and dry patches until they're clean or I get sick of cleaning :DI follow the same procedure for other rifles and other pistols I have.

#2 dabob

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:30 AM

I don't clean my shotgun barrels very often at all. Even my Browning Citori Ultra XS O/U Sporting Clays gun I only clean the inside of the barrels about every other year or so.As long as you don't have plastic wad building up in your barrels or chokes the inside of your barrels should stay pretty clean. Just running a oily patch through the barrel and then one dry patch should make the barrel real shiny inside.I grease the moving parts on the Citori every once in a while but I do wipe down the outside of the gun with a oily rag after every time I use it. It only takes me a few minutes to lubricate and wipe down my O/U Sporting Clays shotgun.My hunting shotguns I will run a patch through the barrel one or two times a year to make sure that no plastic is building up inside the barrel.On my Rem 11-87 and my Beretta 391, I do disassemble them clean and lubricate all the moving parts fairly often. It takes me maybe 15 minutes to take my semi-auto hunting shotguns apart and clean them and lubricate them.As long as you don't have plastic building up in the barrels of a shotgun just running a oily patch through them should be all you have to do. IMOSome shotgun loads do burn much dirtier than others do. So if you are shooting loads that leave a bunch of powder flakes in your barrel and action you will need to clean your shotguns much more often.
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#3 dangerranger

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 11:33 AM

I pull a boresnake through the barrel and wipe down the outside each time its out. this is mostly for corrosion prevention.and every year or so I do a detailed action cleaning. this is on SXSs and pump guns that I hunt with. I recently inherited my dads Remington Sportsman 48 semiauto He passed it to me before he passed on. I asked him how often it would need a full cleaning. He said it had never been further apart than taking the barrel off and the gas piston out. years back he shot it alot, from game birds to shooting informal trap, And even at turkey shoots. so now its had a full cleaning once in 60 years. Maybe Im doing it wrong. DR

#4 Bisley

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

You're supposed to clean them??? Uh-oh!I clean the pumps when they get really hard to cycle, otherwise, they stay pretty much dirty. The auto (1100) gets the full treatment every time for two reasons. One, she is "my baby", and two she is an '80's vintage with a 3" chamber and not really designed to cycle with standard loads. But she will if I keep her really clean. She will fire heavy field loads all day without the cleaning though. Like DR mentioned though, the gas piston is all that really needs to be cleaned (and lubed) on the autos.

#5 dangerranger

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:22 PM

Bisley, this is my only auto loading shotgun, and under the barrel there is a sticker on the gas tube stating " use no lube and no solvents". is this normal in a gas system? DR

#6 Bisley

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:14 PM

Sounds kind of funny at first DR, but makes a bit of sense also. You have a Sportsman 48, which is just a Remington 11-48 that will only hols three rounds. It was designed just for hunting, just as the old Winchester 1400 of the same era (which I have). Three rounds only, takes all the guess work put of a plug for sure. I actualy like it. But back to the story. My brother picked up an old 11-48 at an auction last year between the dove and quail season along with an old Franchi Falconet 12ga O/U and a 20ga O/U. The 20ga's were supposed to be for the kid, but he loved the 11-48 so much he gave the O/U to him and leaves the Franchi at home. I do believe his exact words were "OK, I think I finally see why you guys love your autos so much", he has always been a pump action guy. Of course his is a 20ga and much lighter. I tell you all that just to let you know this: having acquired a new (to him) gun, I researched it well and found out how to care for it and even an old manual. In the manual, it mentions how to care for the gas system. When new they have a felt friction ring that is designed from the factory to hold lube, so extra lube is unnecessary and I imagine is why they say no solvent. I am thinking they don't want you using solvent on the friction ring and removing the lube. I can't imagine not cleaning the other parts with solvent. And since those friction rings have usually been dried out for years, or are missing (like his), we do put a dab of oil around the gas system. But don't put so much as to attract dust and dirt and gum it up. The manual also mentions that guns with compensators on them (like his) should have oil added to the gas system to help ensure recoil and loading since it mentions use of oil (at least when new and with a friction ring) will add a little bit to the recoil of it. Sorry about the long answer, but hope it helps to explain.Oh, almost forgot, here is the link to the manual. I had posted the main page on here before that gives a list of many manuals for older guns but I will put it up here again along with the 48 manual..Remington 11-48Gun Manuals




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