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brass life


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#1 ehd

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:00 PM

what is the life expectancy for 22-250 and 243 cases?. i am full length sizing with my dies set about .002 off my chamber headspace. Curious how many loadings I will get before getting new brass.

#2 docskinner

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:40 PM

In my experience - it varies, particularly with how hot your loads are, but also by manufacturer, lot, etc.

#3 Bisley

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 11:23 PM

Yup. Unfortunately, it's kind of like asking how many miles a motor should get. There are some semi-standards, but way too many variables for close figures. I have .38 brass that has been loaded literally dozens of times, and 06 brass pushing the dozen mark also. But on the opposite end of the spectrum, I loaded a wee bit heavy on the .243 once, and was able to push primers in by hand. Oops.The problem with giving a life span too is that many folks figure they are good up to that point and get lazy and only half-ass check their brass. Very bad habit! Especially with rifles. A much better question is "What flaws should I look for in my brass when reloading so I know when to toss it", because these flaws can rear their ugly head in a single shooting at times. So I would be more concerned with (loose) primer fit, cracked necks or shoulders, and severe rings or seperation at the base. I'm sure there are other things I am forgetting, but it's late, and I'm nursing a cold at the moment :rolleyes: . But hope that makes sense and helps a bit.

#4 ehd

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:51 AM

thanks for the help.

#5 tawnoper

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

Now that you got your dies setup properly and are not creating excess head space you should be able to get a number of reloads out of your brass. As said, loose primer pockets are usually a good indicator they are ready for the trash. I usually end up splitting necks more than anything.
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#6 clampdaddy

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:51 PM

I usually chuck bottle necked brass after the fifth loading. I only have one rifle that the brass doesn't last five loading.
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