Jump to content


Photo

Was reminded again this weekend


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Bisley

Bisley

    Big Kahuna

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,628 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Covina, CA
  • Interests:The three W's, whiskey, women, weapons. No particular order.

Posted 03 October 2011 - 02:17 PM

On a topic earlier last week there were questions about shot size, chokes sizes etc.... and the importance of patterning was emphasized again by some very knowledgeable (and long in the tooth :oops: ) members on here. There's a reason they say it! And there's a reason I refer to them as knowledgeable. I actually do know how important it is myself, but am still amazed at the different results some times, which is why I thought I would share the results so others can understand more clearly why it needs to be done.I should start by saying that we only tested one size choke on each. If you change chokes, be sure and test them all. We (almost) always have and will use full choke, so that is the only choke we tested. I am not afraid to admit that we are slow to shoulder, so a more "open" choke does not serve us as well. With that being said, the first one to be checked was the 20ga 870. I have recently started reloading for shotgun so I wanted to try some heavier 1oz and 1-1/8oz loads for quail/chukar. The thought of course is, more pellets should mean more chance of one to hit the bird with. NOT ALWAYS SO! I learned that pushing a 7/8oz load at speeds much faster than I can buy it (1300-1475fps vs the 1200fps factory stuff) would actually have more pellets hit total and a greater shot density than the load with more pellets. I also learned that my 20ga LOVES anything over 1300fps, and had one of the best shotgunning days of my life. It is a totally different beast with faster moving shot and I could never have known that had I not tested it.As if that wasn't enough, we had to recheck my buddy's O/U. He hadn't shot it in quite a while (he did not use it for dove) so he wanted to practice a little. This is his usual "go-to' gun, but he was having some difficulty. So we put it on paper and could not believe what we saw. The top barrel was hitting a foot or better low at 40 yards. And the bottom barrel was hitting closer to 2 feet low at 40 yards :signs1180lq: . Now realizing what it was doing, he simply covered the clay with the barrel and was instantly a clay-breaking machine again.Moral of the story? By the end of the day, after doing what everyone should do when they change ammo brands, choke sizes, shot size, or shot weight, my buddy, myself, and even the 14 year old "prospect" we broke in during dove season were all consistently breaking clays at upwards of 50 yards. Proving once again that it pays to listen to people with experience. And it pays to "know" your gun. I promise you, only good can come out of it.Best of luck again to all in just under two weeks!

#2 Frank

Frank

    Big Kahuna

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,759 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Beach, Ca
  • Interests:Coyote Hunting #1, Valley Quail 2nd. Former (Idaho) mule deer hunter

Posted 03 October 2011 - 03:50 PM

Wow, Bisley, excellent note & examples of what we should be doing. A great reminder &/or advice for sure!Whether hunting with rifles or shotguns for ANY type of game, it just never ceases to amaze me the lack of effort that some folks put into the MOST important part of our sport. And that is, the SHOT! In other words it's the SHOT that will ULTIMITELY determine the SUCCESS or FAILURE of an entire (costly?) hunting trip... And yet is taken the lightest by so many. It goes beyond imagination!Now, I am mostly talking about folks that considers hunting as their passion & not just another hobby or passing interest. So, I can almost understand someone not taking load testing or proper sight in too seriously if they only consider hunting as a side interest or when nothing else to do. Almost!Btw, I know there is more to good shooting than the above, HOWEVER, the above is the FOUNDATION before anything else can be done... Successfully!Again, :roflmao3[1]: Frankp.s. And as Bisley reminded us, we still have (less) than two weeks before quail opener to check our guns and loads. For those going on opener that is. LOL Good Shooting!

#3 CA Desert Dog

CA Desert Dog

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,937 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nolensville, Tennessee
  • Interests:God, family & country. Predator hunting, shooting, reloading.

Posted 03 October 2011 - 06:50 PM

Youz guyz nailed it. As with most pursuits, eliminating as many variables as possible will contribute to a more successful outcome. Some factors are within our control and some are not. Being 100% prepared and making sure your gear is operating accurately and at full potential will no doubt increase your rate of success.

#4 Bisley

Bisley

    Big Kahuna

  • Gold Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,628 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Covina, CA
  • Interests:The three W's, whiskey, women, weapons. No particular order.

Posted 03 October 2011 - 07:22 PM

I think this is part of what frustrates me so much on many post. If we (especially newbies) would pay more attention to the little tips that are given on here by all the guys that have learned it already over the decades, your knowledge can increase ten-fold almost overnight. I have always felt that anyone with half a brain can look at a map and find the ever elusive "legal place to hunt or call". But what you can't learn from a map are the little things...like...patterning when any variable changes. I've hunted for years, but I still learn a ton on this site when I read between the lines and actually listen. Let's face it, none of us know it all (especially me). And it never hurts to be reminded of the little things we forget sometimes. So next time you go to reply and jump a members case because "you already hunt and don't need to know the basics", remember the lesson I learned here this weekend. We do need to remember the basics no matter the experience we have, and even the littlest "basic" can have a drastic effect. Again, good luck to all. And a special thanks again to all the members here that are always more than willing to help with setting up our skills and our equipment, even if you are a bit stingy about giving up your "secret spots" :roflmao3[1]:

#5 Frank

Frank

    Big Kahuna

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,759 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Beach, Ca
  • Interests:Coyote Hunting #1, Valley Quail 2nd. Former (Idaho) mule deer hunter

Posted 03 October 2011 - 07:29 PM

That's (being stingy) too funny, Bisley... And you nailed it again! When we stop learning, no matter how much or little we already know about a particular subject, we might as well stop altogether.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users