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#1 Haywood

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 09:19 PM

Well I ordered a Lee Hand Press with the breech lock system and a set of .223 dies and it showed up today. I just spent the last two hours or so de-capping and resizing nearly 300 rounds (only messed up 2, I was watching tv and some eye candy came on lol). All in all I've gotta say it is awesome so far and I'm more than likely hooked. Next up is a couple of reloading books, scales and other measuring stuff and I'll be cranking out some ammo. Don't worry the tv won't be on when I start charging lol.
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#2 Shoot-it

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 02:29 PM

Have fun at it.I have the lee set to it is a good set to learn off of. I use rcbs dies it does not matter all dies will screw into them.The only thing i don't like about lee dies is they have no lock Allen screw on the nut.

#3 Braz

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 03:27 PM

If I'm not mistaken, they use large o-rings, which also hold quite well.
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#4 Haywood

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 07:07 PM

I got the breech lock one so once I get it set I don't have to unscrew it, just change out the bushing. Picked up some primers today and started priming rounds I stopped though after 100, it seems some of the rounds have a primer pocket smaller than the others (2 primers went in but were really hard to seat and one got jacked up) so I'm going to try and find a pocket uniforming tool this weekend. I always figured that reloading would be more trouble than it was worth, hard to pick up etc. but I'm kicking myself for not picking this up sooner. What are your recommendations for reloading manuals? I have a hornady one coming but everyone says you should have a minimum of two.
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#5 D-Man

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 07:02 AM

Those smaller primer pockets are more likely former military brass that has a primer pocket crimp. Two ways to deal with that: ream it out or else get a swager. Reaming works just fine, swaging actually helps to strengthen the brass. The primer pocket crimp looks like a little ring around the edge of the primer pocket.Darren
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#6 TonyS

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:31 AM

Haywood,Congrats on getting yourself into reloading. Now you will know why those old guys at the range grin when you take out your plastic box of rounds. I bought one about a year ago to reload .270 since I live and hunt in condor-ville. $50 a box made it worth my while. Now I am thinking about reloading .223 with a special pill that is a non-toxic approved round. Although these are commercially available I bet when I reload I can save some money.Good luck and have fun.

#7 dangerranger

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 05:07 PM

Lees manual is the most conservative, Lyman is the other that I use. I also use Load Books for caliber specific info. you will probably find all the info you will need on popular rounds in a good manual but trying to find specialty info or on lesser used rounds the load books come in handy. DR

#8 Truckeedan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:43 PM

Be sure to inspect all your brass. If you don't have a primer pocket reamer go to your local sporting goods store that sells reloading equipment and pick one up for about $4 or make one by grinding down a slotted screwdriver to the right size. Also be careful when loading the primer cup on the Lee hand press. It will only put a primer in the shell pocket sideways if you put the primer in the cup sideways. Crushing a primer into the shell pocket sideways can cause a chocolate surprise in your shorts. I have a hand press too and my first time I put one in upside down. Never did that again.
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#9 TonyS

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 02:26 PM

Another source for load data is the bullet and powder manufacturer. I don' t know why no one mentioned it to me but I wrote the manufacturer of the bullets I use and they supplied all kinds of info on a wide variety of powders. It definitely helps when you buy the stuff for your experiments.

#10 ratassassin

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 02:30 PM

Reloading is fun and a whole lot less expensive than buying factory rounds, especially when you're talking the lead free stuff. Factory loaded ammo with Barnes TSX bullets is ridiculously overpriced. I worked up the numbers and found I can load Barnes bullets for about $17 a box of 20 for my .308 instead of paying $47. And this includes shipping and haz mat fees for powder and primers (but not brass and labor). A thirty dollar difference? We're getting gouged. Thanks a lot, California. Whatever happened to the ammo vouchers that California was supposed to pass out when the lead ban in Condor territory got passed? In terms of manuals, the Barnes manual is the most disappointing. There's hardly any powders listed in it because they haven't done the work. But if you have to load lead free, you almost have no choice but to buy it. Not only do they overcharge for their bullets, they don't even publish adequate load data. My favorite manual is the Sierra manual. It's comprehensive and interesting reading. And you can trust them. Don't be surprised if you find the Hodgdon data is hotter than the data in most manuals. I've seen that on a couple occasions and it's confusing. Always start on the lower end of the published powder range for your bullet and work up, watching for pressure signs like flattened primers or a sticky bolt when trying to eject spent brass. And if you load hot, make sure you inspect your case mouths after firing to see if you're getting any splitting.

#11 TonyS

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 09:54 AM

For unleaded I try to avoid Barnes whenever I get a choice. I don't like what they did to us here and how they continue to take advantage of the situation they fanned.I am using a pill from a company called Sinterfire. I bought some factory loaded for my .223 from Fiocchi and liked them. Now I am going to reload and probably save some money as well. Sinterfire bullets are a mixture of copper and tin then baked. You have to be careful when crimping them but I would imagine that is the case for all frangible rounds.




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