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Electronic Perimeter barriers for dogs


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#1 mackeralboy

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 07:26 AM

Does anyone out there own or have experience with the electronic perimeter barriers for dogs? My girlfriend has a couple of dogs that like to wander off of her property and we'd like to try to contain them if possible. I was looking at them on a couple of different websites and trying to figure out the best option for her situation. All of her yard is fenced in (3-1/2 aces) except for the drive way. We thought about just putting up a gate, but because of her job she needs to keep the driveway gateless. (long story) I was thinking if she had one of those electronic perimeter gizmos then we could string it across the drive way and whallah....electronic gate for the pooches. What kind of answers I'm looking for are models/brands that hold up well in the enviornment as we might have to put the base unit outside. ( I would build a little box to house it in). She lives in Tehachapi so she gets weather from the 10's to 100'F and snow. I'm also looking for a good deal as most I've seen seem to run about $215 to $260. Any other advice is welcome too. Thanks,Mc

#2 ShooterJohn

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 08:54 AM

I know two people that purchased the types of fences your are looking at and both were extremely dissatisfied. Their dogs quickly learned to run past the electronic fence without even slowing down. The fence did keep them from coming back into the yard though. They found that after installing a standard fence the electronic perimeter fencing was good at keeping the dogs from attempting to either dig or jump the standard fence. But by itself the electronic fences were totally useless.

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#3 Jason

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 09:13 AM

My brother's dog ran right through the electronic "fence" after my son intent on doing him harm yelping each time the electrical shot hit him but determined to get out anyway. Now he has a fenced dog run for the dog for most of the time. Basically if the dog wants out, it will get out of the invisible fence. Most of the time though it doesn't want out and the perimeter works now but it took a while for him to get that way. I guess he finally got tired of being shocked and will only risk it if he really wants out. The collar begins beeping when the dog gets too close to the edge which is supposed to warn him to back off. I think it is a fine system to keep the dog in the yard if you are out there with him but it is a poor system to rely on when you are not around and want to keep the dog close to home.

#4 CA Desert Dog

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 09:48 AM

I need one of those for when my wife and I go to COSTCO. As soon as we get to the check out line, she has to run off for some last minute thingie. Then, I am left standing there when it's our turn and she has the membership card. The virtual fence could be laid down around her.....naaaaa....she'd probably just run through it too. :lol:
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#5 mackeralboy

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:53 PM

Thanks for the feed back guys. I think you just saved me from wasting a couple hundred bucks. I guess I will have to resort to Plan B. :good:

#6 Karl

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 05:21 AM

I have seen them work and not work. If you take the time to train your dog about the fence it usually works. If they learn that the shock ends after they get through they will just run as said earlier. The dog needs to think that anything beyond the wire is also shocking not just the fence. Since you are just doing the driveway I think it would work if you made several runs across the entrance to make it a larger barrier. Kinda like a cattle guard. I had a customer who had one of her beagles attacked by coyotes. The coyote had the beagle by the neck and collar and was dragging the beagle into the brush when they got shocked. The coyote ran off and the beagle received many stitches but healed up. The beagle was attacked again several months later with the same result. No she will not let me kill the coyotes. She says they are just doing what they do. :good:
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#7 mackeralboy

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 09:04 PM

Karl,Thanks for your input. I had thought about running the wire back and forth across the driveway setting up multiple barriers... and I hear you on the perimeter systems working if you do it in conjuction with training. The problem is the training part. I'm very fortunate that my darling girlfriend is willing to drive 240 miles (round trip) once a week for a little lovin, while I only make it up to her place about once a month. (she seems to like down by the beach more.) My girlfriend is a great mother but she is no Dog Whisperer and I'm afraid that any training would fall completely on my shoulders hence being sporadic and inconsistant at best. As far as your customer and her beagle, like they say, there aint no cure for stupid.

#8 Karl

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 07:17 AM

Having the time to do the training can be very tough and I think it is great that you recognize up front that you don't have the time. I hope you find a suitable solution. In Texas they really like the push gates. I don't know if that could work for you or not. Just thinking.No cure for stupid is right. She is very smart but out of touch with the realities of nature/life.
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#9 Hipshot Percussion

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 12:34 PM

These barriers work!!! Most of the time they don't is the people factor. Lets face facts here most people are lazy when it comes to dog training they don't want to take the effort or spend the time. My dogs are allowed to run our property line when they have their collars on they are perfect angels and dont roam, no collars they will push the envelope to the limit. Its funny how a jolt makes them angels or just the threat. I've had dogs all my life and until a few years ago thought I knew everything-- but after watching The Dog Whisperer and learning about dog behavior and what signs to look for, I changed the way I did things with my dogs. It's a hard pill to swallow admitting when you have been wrong, however when your dog is well mannered and does what he's suppose to, it's time well spent with the training.

#10 tinhunter

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 01:53 PM

The barriers can work, but you need to condition the dogs to the barrier so they know why and where there is a punishment for them. The only time I have heard of dogs breaking through the barrier is when they weren't taught about the barrier and why they are receiving pain. These dogs can muscle through the electricity. Even if the dog is not taught about the barrier and doesn't break through the barrier, but is mindful of it, the fact that the administration of electricity without a merit in the dogs mind can be detrimental to their psyche. When you use an electronic caller on a dog for training they are conditioned to the collar to understand that the electricity is a reprimand for disobedience. There have been studies on dogs receiving electric shocks from collars with no merit and it has shown to have an effect on their mental state.

#11 sawmillpond

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 07:35 AM

My fence works fine. Again training. take a few days and walk your dog around the perimiter. Then place collar on low mode. bring him around and pull him in to get shocked a couple time each side of fence. Also buy the best. Mine was p petsafe I belive. It was like $900 six years ago. I have replace two collars, recieved a new update. All under lifetime warranty.

#12 Truckeedan

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 04:03 PM

There are different kinds of invisible dog fences. I had the opportunity to check out numerous different installations when I worked for the HOA in Tahoe Donner. One thing to beware of is that when contractors install the underground wire they are not always careful about respecting your property boundaries. This can cause problems with neighbors and the public. That's why we inspected all installations within the HOA boundaries.I have observed that the most effective fence is one that provides the most painful lesson to the dog. That is the type that triggers a warning shock to the dog when it approaches the wire. If the dogs fails to respond to the mild shock by stopping and crosses the wire, the collar issues a stronger shock to the dog that repeats every few seconds until the dog returns inside the wire. Recrossing the wire turns off the series of shocks and resets the collar. This system is more expensive due to the technology involved but, in my observation, it is much more effective at keeping your dog at home. Training is usually as simple as being outside with your dog when he screws up for the first time and then call or lead him back to turn the shock off. It only takes once (for most dogs). It doesn't take long for the dog to figure out where the boundaries are.This type of fence takes the risk vs reward willingness to take a shock to escape out of the equation. With this system the only reward is to recross the wire to turn off the shock.
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#13 MikeNC

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 04:47 PM

I need one of those for when my wife and I go to COSTCO. As soon as we get to the check out line, she has to run off for some last minute thingie. Then, I am left standing there when it's our turn and she has the membership card. The virtual fence could be laid down around her.....naaaaa....she'd probably just run through it too. :roflmao3[1]:

I here your wife needs one for you too and this one does work :lol:




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