Jump to content


Photo

The .25 Caliber Marauder - Takes Its First Abert's Tree Squirrel Of 2010


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 VarmintAir

VarmintAir

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 October 2010 - 12:41 PM

Posted ImageOn my way out to squirrel hunt, I had to stop and grab a picture of this local lake. I would be hunting an area on the back side of it. I wanted to hunt an area that I have driven through several times while on my way to another spot. It is fairly flat, with a nice mix of mature and younger Ponderosa pines.Posted ImageOnce again, I would be hunting with my .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder. It is extremely accurate, and a .25 caliber pellet leaves little doubt when it connects.After four wheeling into to the area, using a 100 year old logging road, I got my gear set up and started to hunt. One of the fun things about hunting tree squirrels here, is the fact that there are varmints in the form of a couple of types of ground squirrels and chipmunks, that are legal to hunt at the same time, and that makes for a fun day no matter what. These Abert's tree squirrels, for the most part, are rather solitary critters and don't hang around in groups. You really have to get out into the forest and dig them out. During the process of doing that, it is really fun to hunt for the other critters at the same time, and one of the advantages of doing it with a quiet air rifle is, there is no muzzle blast to send other furballs into hiding.The golden Mantle ground squirrel is about one fifth the size of our local tree squirrels, and the chipmunks around here are about one tenth the size of the tree squirrels. The chipmunk population has exploded this year. They are everywhere in great numbers. We live on the edge of the forest, and it is a constant challenge to keep them out of the walls of the house, and from under the foundation and sidewalks. One of the side benefits of hunting the available vermin, at the same time I'm hunting tree squirrels, is the fact that they are a fraction of the size, more plentiful, and make for more difficult shots. It's excellent practice. The shots are at the same distances that I typically get on the tree squirrels, so by the time I get my crosshairs on one of them, in comparison to ground squirrels and chipmunks, they look to be about the size of a small dog.I had been hunting for about two hours, picking off vermin here and there along the way, when I spotted an Abert's tree squirrel on the ground about 80 yards away. I'm sighted in at 50 yards, so I wanted to close the range some before taking my shot. I decided to put a pine tree between me and the squirrel, and move up closer. When I was behind the closer tree, I snuck a peek to see if the squirrel was still there. It was nowhere to be seen. There was a cluster of six mature Ponderosa pines there, and the squirrel had been at the base of these trees on the ground. I figured it had gone up one of those trees, but which one I didn't know. Now the hunt really began.I rested my .25 Marauder on my Stoney Point bipod, and for the next fifteen, twenty minutes, I glassed each tree from bottom to top, and back down. On my second pass through, I spotted the squirrel about 40 feet up a 90 foot pine, sitting on a stub of an old broken branch in the shade, frozen in place and watching me. I shot a range to it, and it came back at 63 yards. There was no wind, so I held a little high, with no hold off, and launched a 27.8 grain Benjamin pellet on it's way for an upper chest shot. I heard the pellet impact, the squirrel jumped and headed left on a branch for about five feet, and tumbled out of the tree. It was dead when it hit the ground. The first Abert's of the year is a female of about medium size. I picked her up, took a picture, put her in my game pouch and resumed hunting.Posted ImageA little while later, I spotted one more at a little over 100 yards, but it disappeared into the forest canopy, and I never got a shot. The limit on these guys is five. That doesn't sound like many, but as tough as they are to come by, it's more than enough, and the difficult challenge of hunting them is very satisfying.As usual, I was shooting video during the hunt. If you would like to view those clips, please go here: http://varmintair.ty...5-marauder.html Thanks for looking.

#2 ShooterJohn

ShooterJohn

    Admin

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,588 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern, CA
  • Interests:Hunting, shooting sports and fishing.

Posted 09 October 2010 - 12:55 PM

Congrats on your first Abert's with the .25, Cliff. You did real well on the varmint squirrels too. I sure that helps to fill in the time between the BIG Abert's. Thanks for sharing and showing us what the NEW .25 Marauder can do. I hope to get mine soon. :signlol2iu:

#3 VarmintAir

VarmintAir

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:31 PM

Congrats on your first Abert's with the .25, Cliff. You did real well on the varmint squirrels too. I sure that helps to fill in the time between the BIG Abert's. Thanks for sharing and showing us what the NEW .25 Marauder can do. I hope to get mine soon. :signlol2iu:

Thanks John, the .25 is very addictive. Especially for what I use it for. Not my choice for a high volume plinker, but for real world hunting, it's a ton of fun. It's great to be able to hunt the vermin rodents while keeping an eye out for the Abert's. Makes for a fun and challenging day, no matter how many Abert's I might end up with. To be honest, sometimes I get so focused on the little furballs, I almost forget that I'm really after the big furballs. :signs1242cn:

#4 ShooterJohn

ShooterJohn

    Admin

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,588 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern, CA
  • Interests:Hunting, shooting sports and fishing.

Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:39 PM

Just being out there in that beautiful country is enough. Well, maybe shooting the furballs is just an added bonus. Yeah, I'm really looking forward to the .25 for a hunting gun. Of course I can always fall back on one of my other .22 cal plinkers. Or my favorite rat-a-tat-tat gun the Monsoon.

#5 VarmintAir

VarmintAir

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 October 2010 - 01:50 PM

You're so right. Some days I grab a sub sandwich, and go out into the woods and just sit in my chair and marvel at the beauty of the place. Good stuff for the soul. I don't know if you saw this, but if not you might find it interesting. Be sure to catch the slowmo footage at the end of the video. It really showcases the power that a .25 cal pellet carries down range. :signlol2iu: You definitely have all the airgunning bases covered, but a .25 cal Marauder would be a fun addition for sure. http://varmintair.ty...-with-powe.html

#6 Brant

Brant

    StubExt

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,187 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Missouri
  • Interests:Shooting, Hunting, PCP Airguns, Flying (home builts)

Posted 09 October 2010 - 02:33 PM

I am hooked on getting a Marauder 25 and only need to gather my pennies. That is a heck of a setup you have. Are you still happy with the Centerpoint scope?I see they mention over 40 fpe for the gun with the right pellet and you mentioned 44 fpe with the Benjamin pellets. That is beats even my 22 CBs I use in the backyard. Currently my backyard shooters include a Beeman 22 cal, A RWS mod 52, and a Rossi youth 22 shooting CB shorts for 34 fpe which is the highest of the three. I tend to use Beeman Kodiak in all of my pellets guns and have had good luck with them. My backyard regularly has deer, turkey, and a few fox but my airgun quarry include grey squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons, an occasional skunk, opossum, and now even some armadillos we have had the last couple of years. The Marauder 25 seems like the perfect high end addition to the arsenal.

#7 VarmintAir

VarmintAir

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 October 2010 - 02:44 PM

You will love the .25 Marauder. Mine does 46 fpe at factory settings with the 31 grain Kodiak, and 44 fpe with either the JSB, or Benjamin pellets. The accuracy of mine is as good as my best Euroguns. Crosman really hit a home run with this rifle. It runs on 3000 psi air, so be sure you have a way to get that before you buy one. I'm very happy with the CenterPoint scope. I wanted another MTC Viper, but they are no longer available in the US. I had a chance to trade for the CenterPoint, so I thought I would give it go, and for what I do, it's been great.

#8 Brant

Brant

    StubExt

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,187 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Missouri
  • Interests:Shooting, Hunting, PCP Airguns, Flying (home builts)

Posted 09 October 2010 - 03:06 PM

I have several alum/carbon fiber 4500 psi paintball tanks that just got inspected that I understand can be adapted??? I am also PADI scuba certified and can always get air from somewhere but paintball is popular around here and there are 3-4 places with air. The 22 CB is 29 gr at 700 fps for the 34 fpe so I am guessing the Beeman is traveling maybe 850 fps? Because of my heavy woods in the back most shots are less than 40 yds but some can be 75 on the extreme end.

#9 VarmintAir

VarmintAir

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 October 2010 - 04:07 PM

You're in good shape as far as air is concerned. These are the velocities out of my factory settings. JSB 25.4 grain, avg 883 fps. Benjamin 27.8 grain, avg 848 fps. Kodiak 31 grain, avg 821 fps. I was using the Kodiaks to take prairie dogs out past 100 yards this past summer. I was getting complete pass throughs even at that range. Power to spare. :signs1180lq:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users