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MARAUDER .25 - You Don't Have To Spend A Grand Or Two For A great Performing .25


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#1 VarmintAir

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 09:21 AM

Posted ImageIt has finally cooled off enough out in the dog towns, to start hunting them again. I headed out to the ranch early this morning. On the way there, I had to stop and grab a pic of the wild sunflowers that are growing along both sides of the County road I use to get to the ranch. They go for as far as the eye can see. We've had a lot of rain this summer, and it's showing in the unbelievable displays of wild flowers. The prairie is in full bloom also.Posted ImageWhen I got to the ranch, the rains had also had a big impact on the local vegetation. It was the thickest I have ever seen it this time of year, and I knew it would make the mornings hunt even more challenging than usual. I've been hunting prairie dogs all summer with my .25 caliber Marauder, and if there was ever an air rifle up to the task, it's this one. The accuracy is amazing, and the power is very nice to have. Shot count is not an issue, because I have yet to get anywhere near sixteen chances at these prairie dogs. They are widely dispersed, and you really have to work at it to get much shooting at all. Final sight-in target just prior to starting to hunt prairie dogs in early summer. Five shots, 30.8 grain Kodiaks, 65 yards. I cranked in one click of left windage, and went hunting. This thing shoots. Posted ImageI slathered on some sunscreen, sprayed a layer of insect repellent over that, gathered up my gear, and headed out onto the prairie. I hunted for close to an hour before finally picking a prairie dog head out of the vegetation. It was about 63 yards out, and I dropped it in place with a head shot. Things really started to pick up after that. I hadn't gone 75 yards, and I saw two more. One was at 58 yards, and the other was at 67 yards. I dropped both of those and continued on. Dogs taken at 58, and 67 yards. Posted ImageMaybe 45 minutes later I got two more. One at 73 yards, and another at 84. I hunted for three hours and got nine prairie dogs with twelve shots. Pretty typical for a morning hunt in these dog towns. Dogs taken at 73, and 84 yards. Posted ImageI'm really pleased with the performance of the .25 Marauder. These dog towns are dusty and dirty, and she takes a lickin', and keeps on a tickin'. So, " How Much Fun Can You Have Hunting - With A PCP - That Doesn't Cost A Grand Or Two?" Short answer.....A TON! If you would like to read this story, and view the hunt videos that go with it, please go here: http://varmintair.ty...and-or-two.html

#2 Rimrock

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:17 AM

Hey, Cliff, been wondering where you have been. Nice shooting, and a very nice .25. Thanks for posting.

#3 Bennie

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 11:17 AM

What is your favorite scope on your long range air rifles? Going to go ahead and get me a PCP pretty soon! Tried to get on Mac 1's site today, but it said server was not responding.

#4 VarmintAir

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 03:43 PM

Hey, Cliff, been wondering where you have been. Nice shooting, and a very nice .25. Thanks for posting.

Been too hot to hunt much in the dog towns. I'm at 7000 foot elevation, but the dog towns are at about 5300 foot elevation. When it's an 85 degree day here, it'll be 97 there. It's cooling off now, so I'm starting to hunt again. Plus, tree squirrel season opens here Oct. 1st, and I'm really looking forward to that.

#5 VarmintAir

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 03:50 PM

What is your favorite scope on your long range air rifles? Going to go ahead and get me a PCP pretty soon! Tried to get on Mac 1's site today, but it said server was not responding.

He seems to have more website issues than most. Sometimes it's better to just give him a call. Most of my long range shooting is done in these dog towns, and it can get pretty windy. I like a heavy rifle, with a heavy scope to give some ballast against the wind. I've tried hunting with my light rifles, like my AA 410 CRBSL Carbine, but I get blown all around. A heavy rifle is easier to hold on target in those windy conditions. I have several of the MTC Viper 4x16-50mm scopes with 30mm tube that I like a lot, but they are no longer available here, so I recently picked up a CenterPoint 4x16-56mm Power Class scope with 30mm tube, and I'm really liking it a lot. It's the scope on the .25 Marauder I used in this last hunt.

#6 havoc

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 09:19 AM

As always very informative and entertaining video and write up. I've got to get one of those .25 marauders! I know what you mean about the heat, I went out tree squirrel hunting last week and it was in the high 80s. By the end of the hunt I was a sweaty mess and out of water. Hope it cools off soon.

#7 VarmintAir

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 12:23 PM

As always very informative and entertaining video and write up. I've got to get one of those .25 marauders! I know what you mean about the heat, I went out tree squirrel hunting last week and it was in the high 80s. By the end of the hunt I was a sweaty mess and out of water. Hope it cools off soon.

Thanks, glad you enjoyed it. Really a fun gun to hunt with. I haven't touched the settings on mine. Factory stock settings, and it's doing 46 fpe with the Kodiaks. As you can tell from the target and the video, it shoots these things lights out. It never used to bother me much, but since I've gotten older, the heat just kicks my fanny.

#8 Bennie

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 02:22 PM

Are you dialing the scope for elevation, or does that scope have a special reticle in it?

#9 VarmintAir

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 04:30 PM

Are you dialing the scope for elevation, or does that scope have a special reticle in it?

The scope has a mildot reticle. The MTC Vipers have what they call their,"SCBR" Small Caliber Ballistic Reticle", it is more like a christmas tree type reticle. It gave more hard aim points than a mildot type, but the mildots work fine too. I don't click. Don't have time to, so I have my trajectory plotted from 65 yards, out to 100 in 10 yard increments, and hold over based on that data. Using an accurate laser range finder really helps for getting good range data to work with. Except for the MTC Viper scopes that I own, all of the rest have mildot reticles, so I'm very familiar with using them for hold over. I don't worry much about hold under data, because I very seldom get a shot under 55/60 yards or so. My zero range for prairie dog hunting is 65 yards.

#10 THE KNOT

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 07:17 PM

Great work again cliff man your living a dream and are a varmints worst nightmare .Some of those shot made me go whooooooooo nice shot .

#11 VarmintAir

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 08:07 PM

Great work again cliff man your living a dream and are a varmints worst nightmare .Some of those shot made me go whooooooooo nice shot .

Thanks, I really appreciate it. I've been very fortunate to live out west my whole life. I've been varmint hunting since 1962. Mostly ground squirrels, prairie dogs, and rock chucks. With some coyotes and jackrabbits thrown in for good measure. Ground squirrels in California, Nevada, and Arizona. Prairie dogs in Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota. Rock chucks in Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, and California. Coyotes, and jackrabbits in pretty much all of those states. Getting pretty close to fifty years, 2012 will be the fiftieth anniversary of when this fun journey really started. What a ride, I wouldn't have missed it for anything. I'm hoping to squeeze out a few more years, before I leave for the big prairie dog hunt in the sky. :rolleyes:

#12 havoc

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 12:05 PM

Hey Cliff, I am finally going to buy a marauder, probably this week. I was wondering now that you've had some time with both the .22 and .25 marauders which do you prefer? I'm leaning towards the .25 because of the the stories of barrel problems with the .22s and also I have been very impressed by your recent videos. I was wondering how is the trajectory on the .25? I don't have a rangefinder yet so I'm concerned about trying to gauge holdover without one as opposed to the .22 which shoot pretty flat. Also how does the shot count differ, how many more do you really get with the .22?

#13 VarmintAir

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 03:35 PM

Hey Cliff, I am finally going to buy a marauder, probably this week. I was wondering now that you've had some time with both the .22 and .25 marauders which do you prefer? I'm leaning towards the .25 because of the the stories of barrel problems with the .22s and also I have been very impressed by your recent videos. I was wondering how is the trajectory on the .25? I don't have a rangefinder yet so I'm concerned about trying to gauge holdover without one as opposed to the .22 which shoot pretty flat. Also how does the shot count differ, how many more do you really get with the .22?

For what I do here in Arizona, I prefer the .25. The shot count on my .25 is 16 on a 3000 psi fill. The shot count on my .22 Marauder is 30 on a 3000 psi fill. The .22 has to be adjusted to run on 3000 psi, out of the box they are set to run on 2500/2600 psi fills, and will give you about 25 shots. Shot count isn't really an issue over here, because the shooting isn't high volume. If I get 8 or 9 prairie dogs on a mornings hunt I've done well. Tree squirrel season opens here next friday, and the limit is 5. I don't plink or target shoot, other than to get the gun sighted in, so again, within reason, shot count isn't important to me. Accuracy on the other hand is paramount. The accuracy of my .22 Marauder is very, very, good, but the .25 is absolutely amazing. It's as good as the most accurate Eurogun I own, and that is my .22 caliber FX 2000.As far as trajectory is concerned, I don't see much difference between the two calibers, shooting the pellets that I do. In the .22, I'm shooting the 18.1 grain JSB's, and they have a BC of .038. In the .25, I'm shooting the 31 grain Kodiaks, and they have a BC of .037. I'm driving the 18.1 JSB's at an average velocity of 867 fps, and the 31 grain Kodiaks at an average velocity of 821 fps. That's only 46 fps faster at the muzzle for the .22, and the 18.1 gives up its velocity a bit faster than the .25, so down range I don't think there is very much difference at all. I like the fact that I'm pushing 13 more grains down range with the .25, and the retained energy is higher at 100 yards. My .22 Marauder generates 30 fpe at the muzzle, while the .25 generates 46 fpe at the muzzle. I do use a laser range finder when hunting, and I believe that is critical for consistent long range results.If I could only keep one of my Marauders, it would be the .25, but then I also have other .22 cal PCP's to hunt with. My .25 is definitely a bit more accurate at long range than my .22 is. If you plink a lot, you might want to consider the .22, if you primarily hunt, and realistically, don't get a lot of high volume shooting, I would definitely give serious consideration to the .25.

#14 havoc

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 03:52 PM

Thanks for the info. I think I'm going to go with the .25. Most of the hunting I do is for tree squirrels at relatively close range so hats why I haven't got a range finder yet. 16 shots should be more than enough for hunting might be rough pinking but I can always buy a bigger scuba tank.

#15 VarmintAir

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 04:04 PM

Thanks for the info. I think I'm going to go with the .25. Most of the hunting I do is for tree squirrels at relatively close range so hats why I haven't got a range finder yet. 16 shots should be more than enough for hunting might be rough pinking but I can always buy a bigger scuba tank.

I don't know what the limit on tree squirrels is in California these days, but years ago, when I hunted them, as I recall it was four. The most shots I've used here to take a five squirrel limit is 8, and one of those was to knock a squirrel out of a tree, where it got hung up on a branch. Sixteen shots is a couple of days worth of tree squirrel hunting over here, but it's a moot point, because I'm always back at my vehicle for lunch, and if need be, I just top off the air then.The .25 is an absolute air hammer. I'm loving hunting with mine.

#16 havoc

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 04:13 PM

The limit is 4 here, and I usually don't get 4 in one day around here. I get about 20 good shots out of my mac1 disco and rarely run out of air hunting so 16 should be fine. I've got a small pony tank I can take in the woods too, fits in a pack and is very lite. I know every gun is different but what pellets does your .25 like best?

#17 VarmintAir

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 05:51 PM

The limit is 4 here, and I usually don't get 4 in one day around here. I get about 20 good shots out of my mac1 disco and rarely run out of air hunting so 16 should be fine. I've got a small pony tank I can take in the woods too, fits in a pack and is very lite. I know every gun is different but what pellets does your .25 like best?

It was pretty much a toss-up between the Kodiaks, and the JSB .25's at 50 yards. The JSB's are 25.4 grains, and the Kodiaks are about 31 grains. I went with the Kodiaks, because I wanted the extra thump at long range (80/100 yards), and they buck the ever present winds in the dog towns a bit better. The Benjamin dome heads had promise too, but prairie dog season opened, so I went with the Kodiaks.

#18 VarmintAir

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 06:18 PM

The limit is 4 here, and I usually don't get 4 in one day around here. I get about 20 good shots out of my mac1 disco and rarely run out of air hunting so 16 should be fine. I've got a small pony tank I can take in the woods too, fits in a pack and is very lite. I know every gun is different but what pellets does your .25 like best?

The pony tank is nice to have. I've got one of the AirHog Pigmee tanks that I can take with me, if I think I'm going to get some hot and heavy shooting, but I haven't used it in a couple of years. I've only limited out here twice in the three years I've been hunting tree squirrels. They are tough to come by. Game and Fish figures the Abert's tree squirrel density here at about one squirrel per 50 acres. They tend to be pretty solitary critters. On occasion I've found a couple of youngsters still hanging around the nest with mom, but mostly I get singles. We have six different types of tree squirrels here in Arizona. Five of them are okay to hunt. The Mount Graham Red Squirrel is protected. One of my goals over the next couple of years is to hunt all five of the ones that are legal. It will require going to a few different areas in the state, but should be a fun project. I'm on the south side of the Grand Canyon. The Abert's squirrels are the ones that we have in the forests around here. A couple of hundred miles north of here, on the north rim of the Grand Canyon, we have a sub species of the Abert's squirrel, called the Kaibab squirrel. It has evolved with a different colored coat than the Abert's. The Abert's are grey and brown on top, with white on their belly's, and the underside of their tails. The Kaibab squirrels have more of a black or charcoal and brown body, with an all white tail. I'm heading up there the second week of October to hunt them for three days. Should be fun. Here's a picture of an Abert's squirrel I took last year with my .22 cal Marauder.Posted Image

#19 HOG

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 08:13 AM

I like the camera mount. Do you have vids?

#20 Heywood

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 08:39 AM

... One of my goals over the next couple of years is to hunt all five of the ones that are legal. It will require going to a few different areas in the state, but should be a fun project...

An AZ squirrel grand slam! :smiley_kewlpics: That's pretty neat. Love that picture, it's a good looking squirrel. :good:

#21 VarmintAir

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 08:52 AM

I like the camera mount. Do you have vids?

Yes I do. Just go here: http://varmintair.ty...hunting-videos/ and scroll down through the different hunt stories. Each story also has videos embedded that you can view. Just click on the arrow in each story, and the video will load and play.

#22 VarmintAir

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 08:58 AM

An AZ squirrel grand slam! :smiley_kewlpics: That's pretty neat. Love that picture, it's a good looking squirrel. :good:

Yeah, that's what I'm calling it too. We have the Abert's, Kaibab, AZ Grey, Chiricahua Fox, and the Chicaree Red squirrels here. So far I've got the Abert's, going after the Kaibab in October, and may have a shot, (pun intended) at the Chicaree Reds in November. Should be fun, and I'm really looking forward to the challenge.

#23 havoc

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:31 PM

It was pretty much a toss-up between the Kodiaks, and the JSB .25's at 50 yards. The JSB's are 25.4 grains, and the Kodiaks are about 31 grains. I went with the Kodiaks, because I wanted the extra thump at long range (80/100 yards), and they buck the ever present winds in the dog towns a bit better. The Benjamin dome heads had promise too, but prairie dog season opened, so I went with the Kodiaks.

Thanks again for all the input, that will give me a place to start if I do order the .25.




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