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#1 BC9696

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 04:00 PM

Curious what the very successful coyote hunters like for options...specifically the magnification & objective diameter. To a lesser extent, the reticle. I tried a couple including Nikon's Coyote Special and found it lacking. Whaddaya guys like?

#2 Old timer

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 04:41 PM

Mime is an old Redfield 3 to 9 40 mm and med cross hairs of course the rifle and scope is old like me
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#3 Pogo

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 06:54 PM

The "coyote special" scope makes me laugh every time I see it. Nothing more than a fancy reticle, a little camo paint, and an extra $100 or so on the price tag. Personally, I find the BDC, and other drop compensating reticles annoying, and they clutter up the image. What I find even worse, is many people just immediately think they can hit 500 yard shots after simply bolting the scope on. I own a Nikon scope with the BDC reticle, and it does work, but it takes a LOT of practice to figure it all out. Then, like all of them, change the magnification and it is no longer valid.I'd spend the money on better glass first, rather than window dressing. A 3-9x40mm is more than enough glass for coyotes. I rarely take mine off of 3x, and then only when I'm looking at something in the distance. A 40mm is plenty, 50mm are much more weight, get in the way, and I can't tell any difference even at dawn. My old 'ugly' gun that I carry in the pickup is a 4.5-20x, and I wish it would go down to 3x when calling. Get some hard chargers and finding them in the scope is more of an issue than magnification. I really like a couple of Nikon scopes I have, seem to be a good value. Leupold is a better scope, but for my budget Nikon seems to work well. Regular old duplex reticle is about as good as it gets IMHO.
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#4 Fjold

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:08 PM

I'm really starting to like the Burris Fullfield II line of scopes for the best bang for the buck. They have the 3-9x50mm and the 3.5-10x50mm that would work out great, low power and big field of view with the ablility to crank it up if necessary. The ballistic plex reticle has three dots on the lower vertical wire for long distance shooting without have to spin the turrets.On the higher end of the price scale they have the Euro black diamond model in 2.5-10X50mm with the same reticles.
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#5 Soreloser

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:08 PM

How big is your budget????On the shotty: U.S. Optics SN4 1x4 w/ circle dotPosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImageOn the .22-250: U.S. Optics SN3 1.8x10 w/ 37mm obj and circle chevron.Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImageThe ranging marks in the lower left are based on the average human being's shoulder width. Which just happens to be roughly the same as a coyote shoulder to rump.Both scopes are also Front Focal Plane. Which means the size of the reticle changes with the magnification and your ranges stay true no matter what power you are on.
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#6 BC9696

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 08:01 PM

I'm really starting to like the Burris Fullfield II line of scopes for the best bang for the buck. They have the 3-9x50mm and the 3.5-10x50mm that would work out great, low power and big field of view with the ablility to crank it up if necessary. The ballistic plex reticle has three dots on the lower vertical wire for long distance shooting without have to spin the turrets.On the higher end of the price scale they have the Euro black diamond model in 2.5-10X50mm with the same retiles.

I was looking at a Bushnell Elite 4200 2.5-10x50 Riflescope and a Leupold 66265 VX-3 3.5-10x50mm Gls Boone&Crk...how does the BF scope compare Frank? I have a Bushnell 4.5-30x50 Elite 6500 DOA on my 22-250 but the field of view is too narrow for that gun and it's kinda heavy. I think it belongs on a deer rifle and am thinking it will match up perfectly w/ a .308 bolt. But then I need an adequate replacement for the 22-250.

#7 Fjold

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 07:52 AM

I've got Leupies VX3's and I'd be willing to say that the Burris glass is as good as those. The BF 3-9X50mm has a field of view at 3X of 30 feet, Leupie doesn't give the FOV at low power, only the high.
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#8 tawnoper

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 09:18 AM

If you are interested in a good no-nonsense scope...real tough to improve on a VX3 3.5x10 40mm standard duplex. If you are into having all the latest, gimmicky gadgetry that will never really serve a real purpose...plenty of options out there.
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#9 BC9696

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 12:30 PM

I just want good clear optics of the proper magnification to get on and hit a yote quickly. Nothing fancy. If it will serve me well on the target range too, I am thrilled! Should handle varying light conditions too.

#10 Frank

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 12:39 PM

Yeah, what's the old saying?... "keep it simple stupid" really can apply to predator hunting, especially since most called in critters will be shot at 100 yards or less or there abouts. Even the seldom 300 yard shot can be made more often than not with just a flat shooting, "properly" sighted rifle (& caliber).With that said, probably my favorite scopes are my (2) Zeiss Conquest, Zplex, duplex lens in 3x9x42mm. Probably!? Just cannot beat its eye relief or field of view without going to a smaller variable &/or more expensive scope. Even Leupold's 3x9 cannot match it the last time I compared the charts / websites & plain ole looking through them. (I have Leupold 3x9 also). I like many scopes including Nikkon & especially Leupold in various powers, such as my Leupold 4.5x14x40mm w/A.O. that sits on top of my pet Remmy 223. But where it shines on magnification it lacks on field of view, comparitively speaking & is sometimes difficult to find the animal. But I still do like using it... a lot! Guess we're sorta nick picking, as there are indeed a ton of good choices out there. It's just that all the bells & whistles may be better served for other types of shooting is all. Maybe? (or unless an individual is just a "gadget" person; which also works) :rolleyes: Frankdo not get too hung up on "clarity" as many folks do... Even cheap scopes can be clear... It's about resolution, which usually comes with the better quality scopes.

#11 Jeff213

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 04:26 PM

I just got my Bushnell elite 3200 3-10x40 for my .223 bolt action. Now I just need to find my first coyote.

#12 Bennie

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 07:49 PM

I like the Leupold's and Knight force scopes. I have not looked or shot through any thing that cost more like a Schmidt and Bender or a USO. If I did I would probably have one of them on something too. So I will tell you to buy the best scope you can afford for the quality that goes in to the high end scopes. There is a difference they track better and last longer in my books and when something goes wrong it gets fixed for free. I did not always have the money to buy them. I used to use whatever I could and if it hit where I was aiming it was good. Let's be honest. Most of the shots that we get when hunting coyote's are 200 Yds or less and I prefer it that way because I miss a lot less at those ranges. You do not need a real fancy scope to shoot to 200 yards and still be able to hit a coyote. As far as power is concerned I am running 3.5 x 15 on one rifle and 6 x 24 on another that I hunt coyotes with. I like the high magnification for shooting small things like squirrels and where I live I can see coyote's a lot farther than any one can hit them. I can shoot to 2000 yds right out my back door. I can not hit an elephant that far though, maybe just maybe a big barn.If the gun fits you right with a little bit of practice you should be able to find what you are looking for in the scope just as quick as you can put the rifle to your shoulder. To see if the gun fits you right do this. Pick a spot or target and aim at it with the rifle. Un shoulder the rifle and and close both eyes remembering in your mind where every thing was. Shoulder the rifle and open both eyes. If the spot is in the scope the gun fits. If it is not you need to work on something. It may be your form of shouldering the rifle or your cheek weld that needs worked on, or you might need to work on the rifle. Too much to explain here but there is several good articles that explain this sort of thing. Any of the scopes will work as long as they will hold zero. I have had about all of them through the years. One of my favorites was a 3x9 Redfeild Widefeild that I bought in the mid 70's. It has broke twice through the years and is sitting in the closet. I should get off my butt and send it in for repair. I think they will still fix it for free. The reason it is a favorite is I have taken more game with that scope and the beat up old Remington it was on than I will probably will ever take for the rest of my life. It was nothing fancy but it sure did work good till it broke.
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