Jump to content


Photo

Mossberg o/u


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 zippy1970

zippy1970

    Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 890 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Morro Bay , California

Posted 12 January 2010 - 10:52 PM

I was wondering if anyone has or used or played with Mossberg o/u's that they have out . I took my gf to the range today & the guy next to us was shooting a 28ga 1100 and she really liked it overall . But after looking 28's are not that cheap . BUt I did see that the Mossberg's run 499-595 . so that won't be to bad . just wondering if worth the effort . Let me know your experiencea . Thanx , Andy

#2 JRW

JRW

    Varmint Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 105 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Linden, CA

Posted 09 February 2010 - 08:17 PM

I won a mossberg silver reserve o/u 12 gauge at a DU dinner a couple of years ago. i was looking for a new waterfowl gun at the time and thought that it might work for me but when i went to my local gun shop and got to check it out there were a couple things i wasnt real impressed with. first i practically ad to break it over me knee to get the action open. i imagine that would loosen up with use but i dont know for sure. also the wood on the one i won was nat very attractive. i also went online and looke at reviews and in almost every review people talked about the firing pins breaking often. in the end i traded it for store credit that i put towards my extrema 2. hope this helps ya.

#3 Mainard

Mainard

    Plinker

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Taft, CA

Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:02 PM

I bought a silver reserve about a year ago in 12 ga. I had recently started shooting sporting clays and had jamming issues with my Ithaca that I had. So I bought the mossberg because I also had a pump but I am somewhat disappointed with the o/u. After about 600 rounds it wouldn't reset the triggers so I sent back to factory. The made repairs and sent it back but didn't say what they did. Then last weekend with less than 300 rounds thru it after the repair the bottom barrel would shoot . After playing with it it started working but I would add a little more money to it and get a different gun.

#4 dabob

dabob

    Bob Morris Foxpro Field Staff

  • Advertiser
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Kern County
  • Interests:Shooting Sporting Clays, Trap and Skeet, Hunting and Fishing

Posted 05 December 2013 - 08:17 PM

I have not heard anything good about them.



#5 Bisley

Bisley

    Big Kahuna

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,628 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Covina, CA
  • Interests:The three W's, whiskey, women, weapons. No particular order.

Posted 05 December 2013 - 08:39 PM

Get the Canvasback (CZ), you WILL NOT be disappointed  :drool: . Light, but not too light. VERY quick and naturally pointing (both my CZ's are that way :wub: ). And rock solid! Or so I've heard :smiley-innocent-halo-yellow:



#6 hntnnut

hntnnut

    Plinker

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 40 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lone Pine, CA
  • Interests:Huunting, fishing and more hunting

Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:22 AM

I agree the mossbergs are junk.  I also have a CZ redhead mini in 28 ga. and its a dream to shoot and not a lick of trouble.  I also recommend the 28" barrels over the 26" barrels, The 28s just seem to swing soooo much smother than the shorter barrels do.

 

Richard



#7 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,054 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 24 December 2013 - 10:10 AM

The pursuit of inexpensive double guns, whether side by side or over/under, has been going on for as long as they've been made. Nearly none of them have been cheap as compared to the mass produced American pump and auto guns. Americans raised on Remington, Winchester, Ithaca, & Mossberg pumps get a serious sticker shock at all but the crudest sxs or o/u guns. Double guns are generally much more expensive because of the much higher hand labor time as well as more precision machining time. Even Bill Ruger tried his hand at a sxs and ultimately couldn't make it cheap enough while maintaining decent quality to get the price competitive with autos and pumps.

Double guns have barrels that are hand soldered together. The fit of the barrels to the frame is all hand done toget the barrels to close "on face" to within thousandths of an inch. The angle or convergence of the barrels is critical to get them to hit in the same place. Often cheap and even some guns costing many thousands of bucks will have a point of impact problem. But its more often in the range of doubles under $5-6k. I have a $3k side by side that prints one barrel a good 8" off target at 25 yds. The solution is to unsolder the barrels and regulate them again by changing their straightness and convergence.

Parts inside the frame have a lot of hand fitting as well. When the gun is broke open it has to cock the hammersand the ejectors have to trip at the right time. Ejectors have a mechanism that must sense that a hammer has fired a barrel or not so it doesn't eject a live unfired shell but know to eject a fired shell.. When the gun is closed the ejectors have to be cocked. All of this has to be timed very closely by experienced gunmakers.

The stock designs of double guns is such that they require more often than not require a lot of hand inletting.

All of this costs $$

#8 17hmrlvr

17hmrlvr

    Squirrel Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Victorville, CA
  • Interests:predator hunting
    upland bird
    friends and family

Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:15 AM

I own three silver reserves my boy shoots competition. Trap with one so it gets a lot of use and abuse. Did have a firing pin break called mossberg they sent me brand new updated pins and springs I replaced them have about 5000 rounds with the new pin and it hasn't broken yet. I hear bad things about them but I haven't had any real issues with any of them and they get shot often.

#9 dabob

dabob

    Bob Morris Foxpro Field Staff

  • Advertiser
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,737 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Kern County
  • Interests:Shooting Sporting Clays, Trap and Skeet, Hunting and Fishing

Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:49 AM

The pursuit of inexpensive double guns, whether side by side or over/under, has been going on for as long as they've been made. Nearly none of them have been cheap as compared to the mass produced American pump and auto guns. Americans raised on Remington, Winchester, Ithaca, & Mossberg pumps get a serious sticker shock at all but the crudest sxs or o/u guns. Double guns are generally much more expensive because of the much higher hand labor time as well as more precision machining time. Even Bill Ruger tried his hand at a sxs and ultimately couldn't make it cheap enough while maintaining decent quality to get the price competitive with autos and pumps.

Double guns have barrels that are hand soldered together. The fit of the barrels to the frame is all hand done toget the barrels to close "on face" to within thousandths of an inch. The angle or convergence of the barrels is critical to get them to hit in the same place. Often cheap and even some guns costing many thousands of bucks will have a point of impact problem. But its more often in the range of doubles under $5-6k. I have a $3k side by side that prints one barrel a good 8" off target at 25 yds. The solution is to unsolder the barrels and regulate them again by changing their straightness and convergence.

Parts inside the frame have a lot of hand fitting as well. When the gun is broke open it has to cock the hammersand the ejectors have to trip at the right time. Ejectors have a mechanism that must sense that a hammer has fired a barrel or not so it doesn't eject a live unfired shell but know to eject a fired shell.. When the gun is closed the ejectors have to be cocked. All of this has to be timed very closely by experienced gunmakers.

The stock designs of double guns is such that they require more often than not require a lot of hand inletting.

All of this costs $$

When quite a few people start shooting Skeet, Trap and Sporting Clays they think that Browning and Beretta O/U shotguns are high dollar top of the line shotguns.

 

Quite often the $2000.00 to $3000.00 Browning and Berettas are the cheapest O/U shotguns at registered Skeet, Trap and Sporting Clays shoots.

 

If you get a good buy on a good used SxS or O/U shotgun you will be able to sell that shotgun for what you paid for it or may be more.



#10 Bisley

Bisley

    Big Kahuna

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,628 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Covina, CA
  • Interests:The three W's, whiskey, women, weapons. No particular order.

Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:32 PM

I also recommend the 28" barrels over the 26" barrels, The 28s just seem to swing soooo much smother than the shorter barrels do.

 

After 20+ years of shooting an 8+ pound 30" barreled gun I would had to agree with you, UNTIL the last few months. A 28" SxS and an eve newer 26" O/U that both allow me to shoot as well as I ever have ith 30" barrel but allow me to shoulder it almost twice as quick (especially the 26") than I ever could the 30" barrel.

 

With that being said though, it would also depend on what you are primarily doing with it. Upland prmarily is usually a quick stright away shot which any barrel does well. Dove or passing waterfowl primarily, a longer sight radius cann be helpful for sure. Either one, short or long will do both, I would just pick the length to suit what I intend to do the most shooting with and simply learn to make it do the other.

 

Check out this link as far as durability is concerned:

 

Shotgunworld.com • View topic - CZ Canvasback Reliability Test



#11 sxshooter

sxshooter

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,054 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA
  • Interests:sxs smallbore shotguns .410 in particular, bird dogs, aviation, BBQ, grilling, photography, red wines, craft beers

Posted 24 December 2013 - 10:07 PM

When quite a few people start shooting Skeet, Trap and Sporting Clays they think that Browning and Beretta O/U shotguns are high dollar top of the line shotguns.
 
Quite often the $2000.00 to $3000.00 Browning and Berettas are the cheapest O/U shotguns at registered Skeet, Trap and Sporting Clays shoots.
 
If you get a good buy on a good used SxS or O/U shotgun you will be able to sell that shotgun for what you paid for it or may be more.


Bob
My experience is that anyone that's a serious clay shooter will shoot a Japanese Browning loose in 2-3 seasons, sometimes less. A 68x will go longer. A target model 682 Gold I know of is over 20, 000 rounds and still locks up tight.

But as you know, P-guns, K-guns, and maybe that new DT-10 will out last a fair sized stack of $3k guns.

#12 hntnnut

hntnnut

    Plinker

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 40 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lone Pine, CA
  • Interests:Huunting, fishing and more hunting

Posted 25 December 2013 - 12:49 AM

Bisley,

 I should clarified, I do tend to like shorter barrels 24" to 26" in my 12s and 20s.   But when it comes to the 28 ga. and .410 bore I believe their lighter weight and thinner diameter barrels swing smoother with a long barrel, the short ones just seem to snappy and don't swing smooth.

 

Richard   



#13 DirtyDave

DirtyDave

    Big Shooter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,177 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Colony, TX

Posted 25 December 2013 - 02:07 PM

I have read that mossberg has fixed the firing pin issue. It is what it is, a cheap shotgun. I have a mossberg onyx SxS 20ga. Its nothing special, but it goes bang every time and its the only one of my shotguns I've shot in the last 2 years.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users