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HUNTING BLINDS


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#1 tonyd

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 12:00 PM

Been thinking about using blinds while Coyote hunting lately. I usually try to find a ditch, large enough tree or rock base but sometimes there is just nothing around. I don't want to get something cheap that will not hold up but I also don't feel like carrying any more in the field then I have to. Pop up blind, a simple camo sheet and a couple of poles, what is everybody using.Thanks Tonyd

#2 mtn dog

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 12:51 PM

Is anybody using those things?A hunting writer made an excellent point that a coyote knows every detail about his hunting territory as well as you know your own front yard. If something suddenly appears in his landscape that wasn't there yesterday, it is probably going to be regarded with great suspicion. I suggest you should leave that blind in the store, keep your pack light and blend with whatever cover and shade you can find. :smiley-innocent-halo-yellow:

#3 Jeff

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 12:53 PM

IN my opinion, coyotes are already wary enough as it is. Throw up something random in their area and you're not going to be helping yourself. While I'm sure that ground blinds and the like have been used successfully by some, I'd venture to say that you're better off without one.You're better off using that ditch, or stump or rock, or tree or even tall grass to your advantage. Don't give them one more thing to wind or be wary of.Just my $1.23.EDIT: Looks like MTN Dog, and myself were responding at the same time. Good info right there.

#4 CA Desert Dog

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:03 PM

What they said. :smiley-innocent-halo-yellow:

#5 tonyd

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:11 PM

Thanks, I always wear full camo and been having good luck latley, Ill stick with what works

#6 mac

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 02:02 PM

I don't predator hunt too much --- I'm an opportunist wrt predators, if I see yotes while hunting big game and its slow, I'll take one out. However for ground blinds for turkey, bear or deer (archery) I did purchase a double-bull blind. easy to set-up, easy to take down and has 360 degree views.

#7 fakawee

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 09:11 PM

I used an Ameristep blind out in the desert 3 years ago when I dedicated myself to taking my friend who was handicapped from Desert Storm. He had always wanted to shoot a coyote but never had the chance. It took us 5 months of driving down there almost every weekend, parking/hiding my Jeep, taking our gear and the blind to a hunting spot then returning to the Jeep to load my friend into a makeshift sled and pull him to the blind. He finally killed one at 83 yds just after sunrise. That was one of the most physically demanding hunts I've ever done. The blind concealed both of us from not only the coyotes eyes (I believe they got used to seeing it after a few months) but the elements also. By the way, my friend has no arms or legs so his comfort was a big decision in choosing a blind to hunt from. Just make sure to surround your blind with available vegetation and it will look almost natural.

#8 BC9696

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 10:37 PM

Wow...IED eh? That's awful. Thank you for taking him out. :smiley_green_with_envy: But I gotta ask, how does a guy with no arms or legs kill a coyote?

#9 fakawee

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 07:20 PM

He was a Navy EOD (Explosives Ordinance Disposal) tech disarming unexploded munitions in Iraq so the civilians could return to their normal lives after we bomb the poop out of them during the first Gulf war. We don't take his "legs" with us when we hunted, that's why I had to pick him up from my Jeep and put him in the sled. It would've been way to hard for him to use his "legs" on the uneven terrains and sand so we opted to leave them at home. Once inside the blind and in his chair, I got his rifle set up on his custom 2x4 rest and when he got comfortable, I positioned his prosthetic arms on the rifle. The right arm had the typical split hook that rested on the bolt. The butt of the rifle in the usual shoulder location. His left arm was propped up by another 2x4 in the shape of a "T" and the hook section was an "L" shape that I had to position in the trigger when we actually got ready to shoot. He was able to move his upper body so the rifle could swing left to right at about a 3 foot range. All I had to do was to line him up with the target (coyote) and the rest was up to him. A small movement of that "L" hook was all that was required to set the rifle off. He got pretty deadly shooting this way at the rifle range, hitting clay pigeons positioned at different distances out to 200yds.Wish he was still here in California but he's got a better life now back in Maine. Thanks for asking BC9696.Sorry to steal the post tonyd. Blinds can work if you dress them up with some surrounding materials and stay there all day.




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