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XR6 vs FX3?


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#1 Rogue

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 08:29 PM

I have a Foxpro XR6 and I am considering on maybe selling it to get the FX3. From what I see, the real only difference is the FX3 holds more sounds, twice as many batteries and has amplifiers for the speakers. Is there a big difference in volume between the two? We call in open rolling hills and need all the volume we can get but what about just adding an extra external speaker to my XR6?All thoughts appreciatedThanks

#2 Soreloser

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 09:34 PM

From what I see, the real only difference is the FX3 holds more sounds, twice as many batteries and has amplifiers for the speakers.Yes the FX3 does hold 8 batteries vs. 4 with the XR6. Those batteries are needed to drive not only a bigger amp but also 2 amps when you are using both speakers. Is there a big difference in volume between the two?Personally I would say that there is. Because of the bigger amp on the Horn speaker, it is able to be what I would consider about 20-25% louder than the XR6. That's not a technical answer, just my opinion in hearing them both. We call in open rolling hills and need all the volume we can get but what about just adding an extra external speaker to my XR6?You can add an external speaker to your XR6, but you would have to be careful in which speaker you choose. The smaller amp in the XR6 wouldn't help drive a large speaker as effectively depending on the amount of watts the external speaker was rated for.If you have any other questions please feel free to ask and hopefully I can help guide you in the right direction. If you decide to go with the FX3, feel free to check back in with me, as we can get you set up with any production unit with a great price.

#3 Rogue

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 08:18 AM

Thanks for the info! Here is another question. I read somewhere that the rear speaker should not be on while using rabbit distress calls, that the rear speaker is for other sounds like for elk hunting or?For the sounds that you use for coyote the horn handles 95% of the pitches and you conserve batteries by only using the horn. Ever heard of that?

#4 Soreloser

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 01:18 PM

I read somewhere that the rear speaker should not be on while using rabbit distress calls, that the rear speaker is for other sounds like for elk hunting or?Personally, I have only ever used the Front HORN speaker while hunting. The rear speaker has a better frequency response for the lower pitched sounds. For simplicity in understanding it, just think of it like TREBLE and BASS. The Horn is for the treble and the cone is for the bass. Using both speakers at the same time gives you great sound but it isn't really necessary when using the rabbits or other distress sounds. Also the rear speaker, because it is a mylar cone type offers a bit more clarity to the sound, but you lose a lot of volume when only using that speaker.For the sounds that you use for coyote the horn handles 95% of the pitches and you conserve batteries by only using the horn.Yes, you will burn through the batteries quicker by using both speakers. Remember since both speakers have a seperate amp, you now have to drive two of them which eats power. But you will still get a full day of calling out of the unit if you are using both speakers at max volume.




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