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Sidearm Ammo Inquiry


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#1 BC9696

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 08:17 PM

When you're hunting a "snake" area, do you carry a single snake shot round in your sidearm (1st shot)? I'm thinking if you're in the woods and Mr. Longtail offers you one SD shot...snake shot ain't an ideal load. Maybe it should be your second round? How do you load your sidearm during rattler season?

#2 fishandhunt4ever

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:10 PM

Personally I stay away from the load. I have always been afraid of the shot load messing up the rifling, so I don't load snake shot. I could be wrong about it messing up the rifling in the barrel, but I just don't want to risk it. I figure that if a snake gets close enough I will just have to make swiss cheese out of him. :smiley-funny-post-sign:

#3 Baxter

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:34 PM

Just carry a machete.

#4 BC9696

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:02 PM

Yeah...I don't already pack enough dog poop right Baxter? :smiley-funny-post-sign:

#5 Bisley

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:18 PM

Carry it in your last chamber. This way you still have five standard rounds for disposal of 2 legged snakes, plus, you usually have a quite a bit of time when you encounter snakes. You then have two choices. 1 you can open the cylinder and set the snake load to be the next one shot. 2 (my preference) you can ever so slightly pull the hammer back, freeing up the cylinder lock, and rotate the cylinder backwards one chamber leaving your snake load next up for shooting. #2 is easier than it sounds, takes about a second to do, and can be done with single or double action pistols.While the rifling in your barrel will not help the patterning of your shot, even home-made shot loads without plastic capsules will not hurt or lead up the barrel any worse than a lead bullet will. Our family has taken many, many a snake (side money as hatbands) without any problems. Almost all were taken with gas check wads-shot-gas check caps. I would also recommend carrying two shot rounds. One round doesn't always quite take the head off, and you do not want to reach down to try and cut it off! Not sure if you know it or not, but they have a very s l o w metabolism and can still strike, sometimes hours later. Please use caution, hate to see anyone get hurt. Good luck and good huntin'

#6 BC9696

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 09:21 PM

But I carry a Glock.

#7 Braz

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 09:35 PM

See, you need to carry a good handgun. A REVOLVER. :flag:

#8 socalkid

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 02:42 PM

+1 lol, I carry a Taurus 66 .357 with Corbon DPX 125gr.

#9 Mayhem

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:33 PM

This is the Doctrine I fallow.1) If you notice a poisonous snake before it bites you simply stay away from it and leave it alone. I don't think a trophy buck is going to stick around for you to shoot him after he hears your shot to take the snake.2) If the sake has already bit you snake shot is rather useless, Pick up a stick beat the snake to death and take with you to the hospital.Now it is a different story if your hunting snakes Snake Bite StatisticsAbout 7,000 people are bitten by venomous snakes in the U.S. annually.Only 0.2% (1 out of 500) to 0.1% (1 out of 1000) venomous snake bites result in death (Me personally I don't care I'm not much more fond of getting bit by non-poisonous snakes cause it still hurts)Roughly half of all venomous snake bites are "dry." That is, the snake does not inject venom into the victim.The average venomous snake bite victim in the U.S is Male Under 30 and often intoxicated. Most snake bites are above the knees and In most cases on the hand or arm (they where being handled or messed with).Being in the Military in my youth I have often traveled to many countries that have Highly venomous and aggressive snakes (Like Sand Vipers Saw-scaled vipers, Carpet Vipers, Horned desert viper, Levant viper, Puff adders Desert blacksnakes, And Arabian cobras) and other creatures (Such as Fat-tailed Scorpions and Death Stalker Scorpions).In the US I have ran across Allot of rattles Snakes Copperheads Cottonmouths and Coral Snakes I have also had run ins with gila monsters, Black Widows, Brown Recluses, and Bark Scorpions. Which are often tame compared to there over seas counter parts. I have learned that by leaving them alone and giving them their space Most snakes will return the favor after all poison doesn't have allot of instant stopping power and doesn't do much good against a creature hundreds of times bigger then you. So unless your hunting snakes Your probably better served by a by a big stick or Cane. The only thing that really scares me enough to waist ammo on it is the Camel Spider/Wind scorpion which is non-poisonous and harmless but it's god awfully ugly and scary looking. They should rename it the Medusa Scorpion as its not a Spider and has next to nothing to do with Camels or the wind. This thing makes you freeze when you see it almost like being petrified by Medusa.Posted Image

#10 Bisley

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 10:08 PM

1) If you notice a poisonous snake before it bites you simply stay away from it and leave it alone. I don't think a trophy buck is going to stick around for you to shoot him after he hears your shot to take the snake.

Good point and very true. But, most every snake I've "accidently" come across is while hunting rabbit or birds. The habitat for these two and snakes go hand in hand. When hunting them, a random shot matters not so much. And since my young nephews, our dogs, and many of my family hunt these same areas, I'd just as soon not have them learn a hard fatal lesson. In a more remote, less trafficed area, they usually receive a free pass. But the same is not true where kids and pets travel for me.That being said, please don't think I shoot them just to hear a bang. They always make nice hatbands, and there's not a kid alive that doesn't enjoy having one stretched out on a stained piece of wood and hung in their bedroom.




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