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Shooting Sticks, Bi-pods vs. Tri-pods


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Poll: Bi-Pod or Tri-pod shooting sticks (21 member(s) have cast votes)

What do you use?

  1. Bi-Pod (17 votes [80.95%])

    Percentage of vote: 80.95%

  2. Tri-Pod (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Mono-Pod (4 votes [19.05%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.05%

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#1 scdave

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 07:46 AM

So Iíve read the post about brands of shooting sticks and Iíve decided I want to go with the Bog Pod brand. My dilemma now is should I get the Bi-Pod or Tri-Pod. Iíve never used shooting sticks before so I donít know the pros and cons of the two. Besides the obvious (weight difference) what has been your experiences with bi vs. tri pods. Iím leaning towards the Tri-pod but figured Iíd ask the advice of people who have used one or the other or both.My thoughts:Tri pod pros:More stableMore comfortable for glassing for long periods of timeUse the attachment for a spotting scope and or a camera mount Keep 1 leg short for a quick set up like the bi podTri pod cons:WeightMore clumsy with the 3rd legManeuverability issuesPack spaceNoise?What would you recommend?

#2 Hipshot Percussion

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 08:28 AM

I started to carry shooting sticks about 5 years ago, when a friend made a pair for me. I use them for squirrel or varmint hunting. However I do not use them when I hunt deer or large game for the simple reason I do not want to carry anymore weight. I walk and stalk alot when big game hunting and carry a small pack (fanny pack type) and water. After carrying your gear with binoculars and range finders etc anymore weight is too much. If I have the time to shoot from a rest I usually would just throw down my jacket on a log. I tend to cover a lot of ground and have found no need for shooting sticks for big game. I might consider it when hunting antelope. Since I'm not twenty years old anymore I have found that the weight you carry will slow you down in fact I have even gone to the lightweight boots because the real heavy weight insulated boots weighted a ton and a day in the field beat me up. It's hard to beat Varmint Al's bi fur pod design for the price and a little work on your part. Check out his web site!

#3 scdave

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 08:49 AM

That's some good advise I'll keep in mind for those big hunts. I'd prefer to spot and stalk vs sitting someplace all day long so I can see where the extra gear could just become too much to make it worth it.

#4 D-Man

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 09:37 AM

I have a Harris bi-pod on my rifle, and have a tri-pod in my pack. Bi-pod is great for a quick shot or a fast stand. If I am going to be somewhere a while, or need more height then out comes the tri-pod. Plus the tri-pod can be used as a bi-pod if you don't extend the third leg with no problem.Darren

#5 scdave

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 10:03 AM

I have a Harris bi-pod on my rifle, and have a tri-pod in my pack. Darren

Although it does seem like it would be convenient in some situations, Iíve been hesitant to put a bi-pod on my rifle because of the extra weight and balance. Is this rifle with the bi pod on it used just for varmint hunting or is this rifle used for boar, deer and other big game as well.

#6 D-Man

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 12:44 PM

I have one on both my Mini-14 and my Savage .270 (big game rifle). With the bi-pod on my .270 and scope, the weight comes out to just over 7 lbs. Have humped that rifle over some rough and high terrain with no problems. If you worry about weight, then just don't borrow Frank's heavy barrel rifle (sorry couldn't resist that one Frank).Darren

#7 clampdaddy

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 03:32 PM

I'd go with a bi-pod style set of shooting sticks. You only get an advantage with the tri-pod when you put a camera or spotting scope on top of it. When your rifle is on two sticks you become the third leg of the system. Mono pods suck. I have one that my wife got me for christmas. They get rid of some of the up and down motion but they still rock side to side very easily.

#8 Frank

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 03:59 PM

Hey, Darren, no problem & I totally agree with you. LOLWell, being different I absolutely love the mono pod. Oh, I forgot to vote but will. Of course & as Darren correctly pointed out, my howitzers are heavy & thus I (normally) do not have movement problems as Clamp did (& why I like heavy rifles). Anyway, as I've often mentioned, the mono pod is substantially quieter and faster when swinging side to side &/or over rocks and shrubs & yet still pretty steady enough. As far as attached bi-pods go, I LOVE them on my deer rifles; well before I quit deer hunting that is. I found them to be no problem with weight & I hunted some extremely rugged country in Idaho, Colorado, Utah & Calif with them (but was also youner too). Also, my deer rifles were always LIGHT weight, unlike my predator rigs. You may want to try the attached bi-pod as I personally would never hunt deer without them. Unlike predator hunting, you usually have plenty of time to set up (& quietly).Good Luck in your decisionFrank

#9 ehd

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 05:16 PM

depends what your using them for. I use them to kill coyotes ,and with that said it is never for sure exactly where a coyote is going to appear. Rarely do they show up right down between your stix (or stick in Franks case). I have grown to like that rapid pivit bi-pod that snaps on to your rifle. You can pick up the forearm and move left or right without the whole works going every which way. when your done with the stand , unsnap and on to the next spot. they adjust up and down etc.. I think some of the members use them and can give a better discriptive than me.. I made a mono pod once out of an oak limb. i forgot my stix. Boy did that suck!!

#10 Possumal

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 04:42 AM

Very good thread with great comments by different people. I have been using some kind of shooting sticks since I started hunting coyotes, and this will be my 18th winter. My first ones were homemade consisting of two dowel rods, 3/4" diameter crossed like the old buffalo sticks, with a pin through allowing them to spread or slightly close which would allow you make them taller or shorter real simple with a simple move. I had a limiter strap fastened securely on the left leg and hole drilled through it every inch or so, and a pin through the other leg which would allow me to make it shorter or taller by just taking up or letting out the distance beween the sticks but preventing them from opening all the way and letting your rest collaple flat. I was constantly tweaking the thing for years until I got it just like it needed to be.Next I graduated up to the Stoney Point bipd that let out to about 70 inches for standing up shots and total height and width adjustments. It let both legs be adjusted quickly to allow you to level it on any kind of terrain. Good product and very popular wih today's hit and run style of hunting. You had a qualiy product with rock steady rest to l00 yds and quick let out of the legs or shortening them to fit your terrain. You could leave it adjusted full length with both legs together, and use it as a super monopod. Very versatile.Then I moved up to the Bog Pod bipod with the same basic of the Stoney Point, but with some much better features that allowed you set up with a yoke that turned a full 360 degrees which allows you to slide your butt a little and turn the rifle without lifting up the sticks at all. Increments of adjustment marked in stark white letters so you could see what number the leg is set at for future reference. Strong enough to use as a walking sticks in hilly country, not like a cane designed for that purpose but much better than nothing but an old stick. Overall a major improvement over Stoney Point as this company incorporated some of these features sooner than the competition. If Stoney Point had installed the pivoting yoke, for instance, I'd still be shooting over them.Finally, the ultimate shooting sticks, the Bog Pod Tripod. When all 3 legs are employed, it is so much steadier than even their own bipod due to the increase stabilization of the 3rd leg. When you use the third leg, it also opens up the possibity of attaching an extra like the Tagalong that Stoney Point offers, which allows you to create a rifle stand, in effect, that you can sit your rifle on and leave your hands free to use field glasses, etc.. You don't have to use the 3rd leg at all, and if you make that choice, it basically becomes their bipod with the rotating yoke. Here again, when either 2 or 3 legs are employed, it is easily strong enough to use as a walking aid.Sorry if this sounds like a commercial for Bog Pod as I don't mean it to be that. I am just showing some of the younger hunters and newbies what I think is the best way to go. You can also buy a shorter version of either model.Good hunting at ya!




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