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SELECTING CALL SOUNDS


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#1 BC9696

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 06:22 AM

Regardless whether you are using a hand or electronic caller...I am wondering if there are any commonly accepted dos & don'ts or if it is all simply guesswork and experience in a given location. Some guys seem to do VERY WELL while others don't, leading me to conclude that knowing little tricks about call selection, volume and timing changes can be vital to effective calling. Any tips for the newbies?

#2 lif2fsh

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 06:05 PM

WIND WIND WIND, O, and try to shoot stright.

#3 tawnoper

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 08:50 AM

Hunt where the animals are. All this stuff (call selection, volume and timing changes) really isn't too important. One or two sounds in an area with critters will do fine.
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#4 CA Desert Dog

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 09:25 AM

My two-cents worth: Pick a call that is typical of the coyote food available in that particular area. Be very quiet, approach upwind and never skyline yourself when approaching your stand. Walk well away (1/4 mile) from your vehicle and be sure it is downwind. If you can see it, so can the coyotes. Start you calling sequence at a very low volume. Their hearing is excellent and you'll be surprised at how quickly they'll come sometimes. They may be snoozing 50-yards from your stand. Call for about 15-seconds and then hunker down, motionless, for 5-minutes before starting the next sequence. Try using a mouth call first, then go to your electronic caller that is positioned away from your location. Use a decoy...feather on a string, anything so an incoming dog gets a good visual of what he thinks is making the sound. Once he sees it, the visual should over ride the scents flying around. Match your weapon to the terrain. If there is a good bit of cover, use a shotgun. If it wide open, pack your rifle. Or, work as a team of two, one with a shotgun and one rifleman. Animals respond (or don't respond) for a variety of reasons. Don't be afraid to try unusual sounds like a turkey call or some other call. High, squeaks work well too. The worst of coyote hunting is never really knowing why they chose not to respond. Just stick with the basics and be ready for action. If you're not ready, they will surely come charging in. Sorry to say, I have been surprised more than once by yotes that have come in super fast. Have fun.
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#5 Moe

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 10:20 AM

Hunt where the animals are. All this stuff (call selection, volume and timing changes) really isn't too important. One or two sounds in an area with critters will do fine.

Succinct and, as usual, right on the money. In modern times when people think you need to wear Spandex and an aerodynamic hat to ride a bicycle and a caller that has up to 500 sounds to call in some mangy coyote I guess it's easy to get convinced that it really is necessary. It isn't. There's some really interesting and fun stuff out there but the basics are still the basics and there's nothing more basic than this. You can be the best caller in the world with all of the best equipment and topnotch shooting skills but if you don't know where to put it to use it's all worthless. If you're calling barren ground and nothing hears you you will never call in a coyote. My tip to a newbie would be this........quit reading all of the dog poop on the internet and get out hunting for yourself. When you're out there observe and learn. You'll make mistakes and in doing so will hone your skills. If you really care about the sport give the critters a break during mating and denning season. Killing puppies and posting their pictures on the net doesn't impress me in any positive way. Recently, magazine articles seem to be getting sillier and sillier, too. If you're going to some web sites to get info on calling tactics you need to understand that about 99% of what you read comes straight out some article or post that somebody read and is reporting as fact. Amongst the guys who've really killed coyotes there are only a handful that have really been all that successful. Whenever one of the very successful guys makes a post it's followed by a cacophony of guys trying to convince you that he and only he has the best advice. Advice that he's gleaned from reading advice from guys just like him.
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#6 dabob

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 04:01 PM

I have access to at least 400 sounds and I think I could get by just fine with about 15 of those sounds on my Foxpro. Probably 80% of the time I would be using maybe 6 of those 15 sounds. If you have two or three good sounds of each, rodent, birds, rabbit and coyote pup and adult in distress you should be good to go. Before I got my first digital caller with a remote I used cassette callers for over 20 years. I had two sounds that I used all season long and it worked pretty good.
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#7 CA Desert Dog

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 02:52 PM

Moe has pretty much nailed it. Ya can't call them if they aren't there. The hard part is finding a place that has not been called to death. Coyotes are very smart and they soon catch on to the calling sounds that most of us use. Some guys have found their special yote "honey hole" and they're not about to share.
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#8 Frank

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 11:14 AM

tawnoper, Moe & Desert Dog nails it... as usual !! The answer to your question can be summed up in 3 words. LOCATION, LOCATION & LOCATION.Call in an area that is seldom, if ever called & (anyone) can look like a world champion caller. Now days that almost requires hunting on private land & even mature coyotes are easy to sucker under those conditions. Sure there are honey holes out there on public land but they are usually rare as hens teeth today. Decades ago I had a real smorgasborg public land hot spot, but is no more & too far away. More recently our group had two such places over the last dozen yrs or so but are now down to just to one spot since the internet destroyed the first one. So BE CAREFUL what you say or when taking pictures of an area with your kill. Bullseye just discovered that a few days ago and can also verify.As far as sounds go, BADCOYOTE has 36 sounds & I have 16. I bet we use less than a half dozen of them. A couple of distress rabbit, mouse squeaker, a few types of howls & of course coyote pup yipes and maybe an injured coyote sound is plenty.Like the old commercial says... "just do it" is the main thing and have funFrank

#9 OrneryOlMofo357

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 01:26 PM

As usual the guys that posted to this thread have given good advice. There are times that I go out, maybe 8-10 times and dont even fire a shot all day. You need to be close to coyotes to call them in. Lots of guys have different opinions on call volumn, types of sounds etc. The best way is to get out and try. You will learn only so much from watching Videos,and TV hunting shows. From what Ive seen, Experience is the best teacher. Its almost like asking someone for a pet load from their rifle. What works for them wont always work for you. Get out there and start calling, and you will be able to create your own style. Good luck.. and keep after em !
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#10 jawbreaker

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 07:46 PM

I totally agree with needing to be at the right place at the right time. I have a spot near my house that I called in my first coyote about 1-1/2 years ago so it holds a place in my heart. I have called that same area about 6 times since then for nothing and 2 weeks ago gave it another shot and called in 4. If the yotes are there and hungry enough they will come (if they haven't been educated too well).




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