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Shooting from elevated position


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#1 BC9696

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 02:39 PM

As a noob w/ a compound bow, I have a stupid question. I'm shooting okay horizontally now that the bow has a sight on it but seem to be shooting high when practicing from the upper balcony (my home version of a tree stand) in the backyard. Is there some rule of thumb regarding shooting from an elevated position I should know? Seems like I have to aim a bit low to hit the target.

#2 jawbreaker

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 07:25 PM

You have to shoot for the yardage as if you were on the ground. What seems like 20 yards from 25 feet high is actually much shorter. You can use the pathagarian theorum to calc out the distance but you should get the hang of guessing after a little practice. If you hunt from a tree stand you can range the trees around your stand before climbing up and use those distances at the elevated possition.Hope this helps, Ron

#3 BC9696

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 09:27 PM

I never expected to read the words "pathagarian theorum" on these boards. :lol:

#4 SpokaneSlayer

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 12:45 PM

Jawbreaker is absolutely right. The reason for this (and shooting uphill for that matter) is that gravity doesn't have as much of an effect on the arrow's trajectory. If you can, get one of those rangefinder's that compensates for the angle. In the meantime, shoot from an elevated position at different ranges while aiming where you would normally at that range. Observe how high that arrow hits and after a while you should know how low to place that pin to hit where you want.

#5 BullsEye

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 01:10 PM

Gravity is a constant. The arrow will hit high if you are aiming from a high point or a low point because it is arcing in trajectory. The best think to do is get the distance to the target on a horizontal plane. Then you can be higher or lower from the target and know the appropriate pin to use.

#6 Thumper Dunker

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:50 PM

Ditto on what the others said . And practice, practice, practice. I try to shoot every day even if its only 5 minutes.

#7 BC9696

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 01:20 PM

Okay, am holding a fist sized pattern w/ 10 arrows at 20yrds consistently from my bedroom patio...now I need a bigger backyard cuz my neighbors don't want arrows flying across their property. <g> Sure wish there were a place around where it was legal to practice like that park in Fountain Valley. sigh

#8 river rat

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 01:52 PM

checkout the mildot master it will help you understand shooting at angles.Its a cheat sheat so you dont have to do the math but you can also measure the angle. I used one over seas.www.mildot.com

#9 Nalgi

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 08:24 PM

yes aim lower, your true distance is from the target to the base of the tree

#10 SAGITARUS

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 03:59 PM

Just buy a Nikon or Bushnell archers range finder and solve the mystery.........it's worth it.

#11 OrneryOlMofo357

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 05:10 PM

Shooting at objects downhill cause problems for alot of shooters. When I did competitive archery I went to many tournaments that had these types of targets. One thing that enters in is, When you are drawing your bow on a level target "which most practice" your body is straight up and down. Your anchor wether it be fingers, or a shooting release both find their spot. Now when you sight in at a Downhill target, How do you draw the Arrow? Do you bend at the waist look at the target and draw the bow? If you do there is a chance that your anchor will move because of the new position of your body. Alot of target shooters "on a downhill target" Pull the bow and anchor while looking straight ahead, then.. bend at the waist keeping your upper body and anchor point much more consistant. Try it and see. Lots of thing change when you draw a bow while in a bent position, draw length included. Try putting 4 arrows into a spot the size of a quarter, and you will see it takes practice. Good Luck.




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