donkey12

hearing protection

43 posts in this topic

I wear plugs when varmint hunting and target shooting but not for anything else. Some pistols I simply refuse to shoot without muffs. That's the main reason I switched from a .44 mag to a .45 colt as my field revolver. Waaaayy less noise.

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All the time when target shooting. and most of the time when squirrel popping. I too got that dang noise in my ears got to sleep with a fan going. Mine is from industrial noise and the doc. said that they were getting old faster than the rest of me. :roflmao3[1]::horse apples: I hate asking my wife what all the time.

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I do that to my wife too Tony. But she says it's because I just don't pay attention to what she says. Huh! What did you say? :horse apples:

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I forgot to answer the basic question. ;) When I'm hunting or target shooting I just put these Peltor Tactical 7 Classic Mickey Mouse ears on when I get the guns out and take them off at the end of the hunting day. Same at the range. With the amplifiers they kinda subsitute for hearing aids. Too bad I didn't have them when I started shooting. Oh yeah, they didn't have transistors then. :censored[1]:

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Muffs while at an outdoor rifle or pistol range. Both foamies and muffs while at an indoor range. Only foamies while shooting clays (muffs sometimes get in the way when shouldering a shotgun). I'll usually have a foam earplug in my left ear (I'm right-handed) while in the field. Since I've noticed a bit of hearing loss in my right ear, I'm seriously considering getting an over-ear type electronic hearing device (walker's game ear) for the field, and some electronic muffs for the range. Anyone have experience with the $35 Caldwell electronic muffs? I've seen several commercials for them, but haven't heard anything else about 'em.

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Chris... the Caldwell ES-85's are a good product. For a price of less than $20 (on sale, just look around) they are a great investment. Sure, probably not as good as the Pro-Ears or other +$200 dollar class, but I have no complaints. I think I paid $19 on sale from Midway.

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I have a set of the Caldwell and a set of the Peltor Tac 7. There is no question that the Peltor is the better set. Way better. With that said, there is nothing wrong with the Caldwell. They are a little slow coming back on after a shot, and the quality of the sound is not as good, but they sure do work. I use them when running the chain saw, mowing the yard, running the woodsplitter, shooting, well, you get the idea. For $20 you cannot go wrong.

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I wear them all the time range or field. I always cover my ears when walking on the jobsite by a stud saw or other loud noise.Use them early and use them often.If you're ears ring after an event you have alread done damage. The damage is cumulative and is not reversable. As a (amatuer but very busy) mixing engineer I have always been very sensitive to even knowing when my ears get fatigued, which can lead to less sensitivity and increasing the sound level just to hear the specifics to the point where damage can occur.It is a real travesty that this information wasn't marketed earlier - especially during the early rock years when louder amplifiers became available and used. Check out what happened to Peter Townsend of the Who.Anywaythis one is close to my heart so that's why the soapbox.Bearing with the noise is not macho - it is foolish.

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at the shooting range, my concern is that (my hearing isnt good anyways) if i come up on a bear, and i mean grizzle bear. ive been going to idaho way up there, and the bears are up there along with wolves. i dont want to be a easy meal lol

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I use a cheap $20 electronic ear muff from ebay, but I'm looking to upgrade to a msa sordin supreme V. Peltor also made great muffs.

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One of the Better and Cheaper solutions you can get is the military flanged ear plugs. They are really good at reducing loud noise while allowing you to hear softer noises like twig snaps and talking. They are darn near as good (but not AS good) as some of the electronic solutions. They cost a heck of a lot less.I used to use these in the police academy until I had a problem Hearing the range officer when he talked on a load speaker. I had no problem hearing when he talked normally but as soon as he started on the loud horn I had a heck of a time hearing him.

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I met a guy at the range yesterday that said he found a bargain on electronic ear plugs. Says they have amplification and all that stuff and he got them for $59.99 from Bass Pro. I told him before he goes to the firing line, he better double check the package those came in because I remembered seeing that those ear plugs did not suppress any noise. Well, at the cease fire, we headed to our benches. I broke out my CZ 527 .223 with it's custom made muzzle break. He broke out a Ruger 10/22. He put his newly bought earplugs in and said they feel great. I just smiled and put my $1400.00 Walker Game Digital earplugs in. When the range master said the line is hot, I fired my CZ almost simultaniously with the guy on the other side of him, who was shooting a .300 Win Mag. I saw the guy with the new earplugs, jump up and run out of the shooting area like he was stung by a hoard of bees :roflmao3[1]::roflmao3[1]: ..... I really feel for the guy but when it comes to hearing protection, you get what you pay for and I value the hell out of my hearing! Sure hope that guy isn't a CPC member!!!

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And for anyone that thinks those $1400 Walker Game Digital earplugs are expensive, try buying my hearing aids, which are not the most expensive around, but still cost over $5000 for the pair. As they say, pay me now or pay me later.

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When I was a kid my dad used to drag me along to the old rifle range in Vallejo. I don't remember ever seeing anybody wearing ear protection, this was in the late 60's and early 70's. By the time I was in junior high I already had tinnitus. As others have said 365/24/7. At the range I use muffs but have used both plugs and muffs at the same time for more reduction. I've never used anything while hunting but probably should to help save what little hearing I have left.

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