moontiger

Camo jobs

82 posts in this topic

If anyone know of such a product I would love a link. Repainting is a breeze and alot of fun, but it would be nice to be able to save/protect a sweet camo job. I love some of those shotguns pictured above. You have some sweet paterns going there wannakillacoyote.....who i will refer to from now on as WKC.
Haha, I do have quite a long handle. :hellohello9il: I think I remember duplicolor or maybe some brand at Brownells having an Ultra flat clear paint. I can't find it now.I don't worry about it though as all of my rigs are for hunting so if the camo job gets messed up, it really doesn't affect anything.

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100_0129.jpgand my 25-06
Man I love those broom jobs. I'm gonna have to go buy a broom before I paint my next one. :roflmao3[1]: I think the Kel-tec is destined for a Broom job. :hellohello9il:

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I'm partial to the broom jobs too. I was wondering what was used to get that pattern. What is the specific process?I assume you paint the whole rifle with a base of the lighter color and they splay/spread the broom bristles or whatever pattern you're using and spray the different colors to break it up.

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^^^ Yep, pretty much.

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If anyone know of such a product I would love a link. Repainting is a breeze and alot of fun, but it would be nice to be able to save/protect a sweet camo job. I love some of those shotguns pictured above. You have some sweet paterns going there wannakillacoyote.....who i will refer to from now on as WKC.
Clear Rustoleum was recommended to me. WKC is this the clear that you saw result in a "Satin" finish?

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post-12-1221347313_thumb.jpgpost-12-1221347391_thumb.jpgpost-12-1221347358_thumb.jpg

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Excellent job guys...Got some good ideas!!!!! :horse apples:

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Definitely a thread to pin. Been practicing on an old army ammo can, and I'm glad I did rather than just trying it on the gun without any practice. A couple of the colors I got originally reflected light so bad that I could have signalled a rescue plane with them. Going for the Army Digital look, and the last time I practiced it I was pretty impressed. I am going to incorporate some large tiger-stripe type pattern in with it, to help avoid the appearance of blending together at a distance. I got a good feeling about this technique. My brother let me borrow his digital camera so I can document the process!

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Here's my factory stock off of my savage that i used to practice on.....ThepetsGunsandNaughtypics030.jpgHere is my shotgun...ThepetsGunsandNaughtypics037.jpgHere is the Mini 14....guns001.jpg

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Supplies needed1. 3-4 different colors of flat/matte spraypaint (I used Rustoleum Sandstone, and primers)2. Sandpaper (around 240, and 400)3. Tape (easy on, easy off variety is nice)4. Artist sponges (found at any arts/crafts store)5. fishing line (heavy test)6. earplug or styrofoam peanut7. Windex/paper towels8. tree with low/horizontal/strong branch9. paper plates10. some sort of medium to practice on11. latex gloves Select matte colors to avoid having a paintjob that reflects sunlight. I took several colors back to the store because they were reflective enough to signal an airplane with (forget about any “satin” paints). I HIGHLY suggest you practice painting on another platform several times before painting your rifle. This will likely give you more ideas, and definitely instill confidence in your work by the time it’s time to do the gun. Step 1. Take a deep breath, clear your head, and relax. Everything is going to be alright, and your gun will thank you afterwards. Step 2. Sand any wood down starting with about 240, then finishing-up with about 400. Step 3. Plug the muzzle with the earplug/Styrofoam, then tape off any areas you don’t want painted (openings in the receiver, air reservoir, scope lens, etc) It is better to cover to much of the area with tape than not enough, as touch-up will be easy; removing paint from the innards will not.. I taped-off the checkering on the wood as I didn’t want to mess with sanding it, and also thought it would look pretty neat.Gunpaintjob006.jpg Step 4. Use the fishing line to suspend the gun from the tree at a comfortable working level to enable easy access to both sides. This allows the painting and drying of both sides of the gun simultaneously.Gunpaintjob008.jpg Step 5. Windex the metal surfaces of the gun to remove any dirt, and oils from your hands (I forgot to do this part). Step 6. Double-check your tape, then take your base color of spraypaint (I suggest using the lightest of your colors for the base) and carefully spray the gun with a light layer at a time to avoid excess paint from depositing which will form a “drip”. Take particular care to go very light on the wood, and plan on doing another coat on the wood after the first one dries if necessary, as wood can absorb some paints . I learned the hard way that trying to remove any drip that may form by wiping it off, or touching it just makes it look worse, and more un-even. Allow ample drying time. Gunpaintjob009.jpg Step 7. Check the tape again. Wear latex gloves to enable steadying the rifle without depositing any oils from your skin. Take a paper plate and spray a puddle of your first color onto it. Again I suggest starting with the lightest color/shade first (in this case grey primer). After dipping the sponge into the paint, dab it onto the un-painted portion of the plate a time or two to avoid applying excess paint to the gun (it doesn’t take much). Go very generous on the pattern with this color, as the others will easily cover it. Allow ample drying time.Gunpaintjob011.jpgGunpaintjob015.jpgGunpaintjob016.jpg Step 8. Repeat step 7 with your next lightest color. Use a new sponge. Do not be concerned with overlap, as that is why you go heavy on the first color). Gunpaintjob017.jpgGunpaintjob018.jpg Step 9. Repeat with your darkest color. I suggest a much darker color for this phase, and that it be applied sparingly, as it is there only to help break-up any consistency in the pattern and simulate shadowing. Use a sponge with very large pores for this part to avoid excessive blotching (use the Marine Digital pattern for an example of the proper ratio of the darkest color to the rest, and how it should look). Next time I do this part I will use a smaller sponge, as this time it seemed a bit excessive in some spots. Allow drying time.Gunpaintjob019.jpgGunpaintjob021.jpg Step 10. Go out in the field in your camo and take pictures to post online (black and white is nice), then put the rifle in the garage/shed for a couple days until the paint smell goes away.Gunpaintjob031.jpgGunpaintjob036.jpgGunpaintjob037.jpg

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GREAT WRITEUP!! Thanks! I may have to give that a try. I would personally go with some different colors, but the pattern and process is great!!

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Thanks, Wannakillacoyote! This rifle is going to see the most use against coyotes, and since they can't see the colors anyways, the shading and lack of reflection were more important to me than color on this gun. The colors available to me in town that didn't reflect to much light were very limited (a flat, light green proved impossible to find). I may go over it again, and go heavier on everything, as it seems pretty difficult to over-do it. Next time, I will reverse the base color Sandstone with the darker Sandstone, and see how that works. I am also going to try colors more like the actual Army Digital, and Marine Digital on some other equipment when I can find a better assortment of colors.

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Nice job of painting and those are some cool pictures! Just curious, is that red colored vine Poison Oak? Almost looks like it, hope not though if you're allergic to the stuff.

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You guys got me wanting to repaint somthing! Any one want to help with my truck? Im going to get in big trouble :roflmao3[1]: nice stuff guys.

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I have since figured out how to make the images black and white to see the contrast in shading. I didn't have the camera when practicing, so I didn't have that benefit until I got the images uploaded onto photobucket today.I should have noticed that the grey primer and the base color I used are practically the EXACT same shade. I'm going to go over it again with more of the darker Sandstone color, and the darker primer as well. When I can find some non-reflective green I will add some of that but not much as a small amount of green has a big affect.Looking at the true military digital camo, it is usually only three colors (or shades) anyways. Probably for a reason I guess.I think it will be more effective if it is just a bit darker overall, anyhow. Gunpaintjob037-1.jpg

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Cool, reminds me of german flectar camo.

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Cool, reminds me of german flectar camo.
Your right it does look similiar. I really like the German Flectar pattern. I went ahead and changed it up a bit so it would be darker, and show more contrast between shades. It doesn't look as clean as it would have had I done it this way from the start, but I think it will work just as well. I'm taking this gun to the hunt, not to the prom.HPIM0447.jpg

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Those are some good looking paint jobs. I've always liked being able t change the look according to the season and terrain. Mine may not look like much but it fits the need and the budget.post-3-1265937078.jpg

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