Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BigRagu

How important is this to do?

Recommended Posts

I'm speaking of the procedures to break in a brand new rifle at the range, and in this case a savage. The shoot, then clean, then shoot( can't remember the daft procedure, and I have it spelled out somewhere). Is it that important? Anyone not follow the procedure and have had negative results for not doing so? 

It seems like it would be a pain, with all the added cleaning equipment being brought to the public range, the time frames with the rangemaster calling out to shoot or stepping away from the bench. Not to mention always being aware of where the muzzle is pointing. Can you all share your experiences?

 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a hunting rifle I only clean after they start shooting bad or worse than they have in the past. I run a oily patch through them if the rifle has seen some real bad weather. My rifles seem to shoot better fouled. If I clean them they will throw a shot or three before they start shooting right again. I am not a competition shooter though. My rifles shoot under a inch at 100 yards with all that I have said or I won't keep it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Had the same dilemma some time ago.  And just left all that to benchrest guys.

Does it really harm accuracy OR decrease a barrel life? - I changed those questions to : 1) Does my application really require such level of accuracy, 2) do I really need such amount of bullets downrange with 1 barrel (or how much time it will take to burn the barrel) and 3) the most important part: can I shoot on par with the rifle.

1) I need to be able to put a bullet into 3"-4" up to 250-300yards. I got some ammo (nothing crazy: hornady with match bullets, 50C per cartridge)  and was assured that rifle can shoot less than 1 inch at 100 yards and that was with factory ammo.  2) 223 can go up to 4-5k rounds before giving up. And with my current shootin rate it will take 3-4 years to burn the barrel. I stopped worrying about barrel life - ammo, gear, range fees and other things cost much more than a barrel. 3) no way I can outshoot the rifle. all 0.5 moa groups are from front/rear support, gun range conditions (no angles, no wind, known distance, comfortable position, a lot of time for a shot), reloading. The very first time I pulled a trigger on a gun in my hands without artificial support - I new that I need to focus on that, instead of trying to reach crazy 0.25MOA level with beddings, reloads, 36x magnification scopes, target triggers, etc on a bench

 

So... after first 5 shots - everything was ok with a rifle. I finished the box, cleaned the rifle and that's it.

This days I even don't clean it with a rod, just pull boresnake 2-3 times after the range and that's just to protect it from moisture (I put some oil/clp/whatever is close to me on a boresnake)

 

The only special thing: i'm trying to track "cold bore shot", just in case if rifle shoots somewhere else with the very first shot of the day

 

That's my very very limited experience... your situation or expectations may differ.

I hope that helps

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More shooting, less worrying. I have never in my life bought into the shoot one, clean BS. Most of mine can be made into one hole 5 round groups with the right load (and me having a good day). When they get copper fouled you can not help but know it. It will shoot 1 or 2 shots dead on, then shotgun patterns after that. This is because after the first shot the copper fouling becomes gummy and things go as tray from there. When that does happen, just grab a can of Wipe-Out and you will be back to punching bulls in no time ;). Other than that, don't believe everything people, especially magazine writers, just repeat as gosphel. With today's materials and tolerances you almost have to try to not find a decent load to make your rifle shoot well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took my new Ruger American rifle In 7.62 x39 out to the range this weekend . I put 100 rounds through it and when I disassembled it to clean it was like I didn't even shoot it . So I put it back in the safe dirty ,I don't clean my guns that often maybe every 500 rounds or so never had any issues . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they  break in new rebuilt race engines?

If it shoots like crud ,clean it,if it still shoots like crud..get rid of it.

Never really noticed any differance so called breaking in a barrel on any of my comp guns as opposed to just shooting them.Maybe I have been lucky over the years but good barrels and good gunsmiths negate that type of stuff.

And the boxstock guns I use regularly have shot great right from the get go.Even my little 17 Rem.Which has a lot of ammo run through it still shoots better than my ability to shoot it.

Heck, some of my guns even shot great fire forming brass and you would never think that would happen.

But I am lazy by choice so there ya go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor and I bought the same gun at the same time (really good deal) and we broke one in the way you describe and the other one we just cleaned real well and started shooting. No difference in the accuracy at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 2:25 PM, calpik said:

The only special thing: i'm trying to track "cold bore shot", just in case if rifle shoots somewhere else with the very first shot of the day

I try to always shoot 3 or 4 rounds at paper before hunting with a rifle that I have cleaned the barrel on.

I noticed with my 223AI rifles  with just a little oil in the barrel after cleaning, the brass will not fire form all the way on the first shot after cleaning. So if the first shot after cleaning doesn't build enough pressure to fire form the brass there is no telling what the speed of the bullet is compared to the same load shot through a dry barrel that has been shot through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a factory barreled rifle it won't make a lot of difference.  On a hand lapped, match barrel you need to do some new barrel break in. 

When the gunsmith chambers the barrel blank and cuts the throat, his reamer is going to leave microscopic ridges across the bore.  The shoot, clean, shoot, clean, shoot, clean, routine helps keep these ridges from filling with copper from the bullets and allows them to get worn smooth by the first few rounds that are shot.   If you do the proper break in then the throat will be as smooth as the rest of the barrel and less likely to copper foul for it's lifetime.

Krieger Barrels website gives a good explanation of this.

What Bob is talking about is something that is commonly seen with factory barrels, the first few rounds in a clean barrel do not hit at the same point of impact or group as well as a barrel with a little fouling in it.  I have a 7mm Mag Ruger that will not group consistently after cleaning until it has at least 15-20 rounds through it.  It's a stainless barrel but I think that it must have a very rough finish that needs to be fouled thoroughly to shoot well. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With more barrels being ruined by improper cleaning than all other reasons combined, as stated earlier, quit worrying and start shooting. If I sold barrels for a living I would tell you to clean it after every shot too, more chance for you to ruin it. When your first shot hits and the rest shoot shotgun patterns is usually the sign of copper fouling (the copper gets gummy after the first shot hears it up) run some Wipe-Out through it and repeat. It's like people aren't happy unless they find something to make shooting/hunting difficult and take all the fun out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×