Youngster18

Holes in PELTS

32 posts in this topic

hey i was woundering if there is any trick to fixing the sometimes giant holes that the exit wound can leave. is there a special way to sew it up. when do u do it when its freshly skinned or after its been salted and washed and almost ready to be tanned?. anything u guys know on skinning would be helpful. oh and i want to try to do my own taxidermy on a rugg for a bobcat i have in the freezer, is there any were i can buy my own supplys or molds for just the head?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know Vandykes carries just about any form you need for a mount..Sew the hole up while the pelt is soft, I would do it after it is fleshed because you are going to rip the stitches if you try to flesh when it's sewed up. And keep your stitches as close to the edge as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok but if i stitch it while the pelt is soft later when i stretch it will the holes from the stitching get bigger? does vandykes have a web site?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thay do . And you can get all you need from them, used them for years. Just type vandykes taxidermy and serch. Good luck . Some times part of the pelt may be missing. Use a pelt freindly round :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks. oh but what about the stiching when you stretch the hide. wont it make more holes. or even bigger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks. oh but what about the stiching when you stretch the hide. wont it make more holes. or even bigger?
Flesh it, tan it then sew it. If its properly sewed up the sticthes should hold when you stretch it. You can use fishing line (Spider wire works good) and then it wont be as visiable from either side. Make sure you match up the hide good though and that you dont bunch it up at the stictches. You want the sticthes fairly close together. When your done sewing the hide should lay flat..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also find using the baseball stitch the most useful. And stitch it from the inside. Small stitches are the ticket. If it is a tear seam, don't pull the opening closed to the center. Create a long seam along the tear line. The hair will lay flat that way. I send my pelts out to a tannery to be done. If you send them out and then stitch it later, it may come back with a much larger hole. Since you want to tan the thing yourself, you can take better care and then stitch it up after the tanning, when the hide is stronger.db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poprivets.....Walt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i wish duct tape was the answer. thanks you guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boszik ang Coyotehuntress are both bery correct, I do taxidermy on the side. Sew it after it is tanned and baseball stitch is my favorite. A curved needle works best for me. You can get a ton of info at www.taxidermy.net There are many good suppliers. I personally like Mc Kenzie, research maninkins, or WASCO. They will all help you with questions you have right over the phone also. Good luck!Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks. where would i look to learn the baseball stitch? and does doing ur own taxidermy pretty expensive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It isnt that expensive you can do a full body coyote for probably under 75 bucks, i can do a duck for under 30 i charge 200 though. It just depends on the quality of materials you buy, some stuff is worth it and other stuff your average customer isnt goin to even pay attention to and will probably never notice. Like recreating the nicitating membrane on a duck, or recreating the septum on the inside of a deer's nostrils. A judge at a taxidermy competition is going to want to see it but joe blow wont ever know. I would suggest maybe practicing on a coyote rug or two before you start in on your bobcat, I dont know about you but for me they are a little toughter to come by. Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks. where would i look to learn the baseball stitch? and does doing ur own taxidermy pretty expensive?
It is cheeper. but start out on stuff like yote and rabbits racoons and mayby a deer hide (rugs) but if you get that once in a life time buck let a pro put it on the wall. Start with the small stuff and one day you might be that pro. :) Man that stuff is just as addictive as varmints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks. where would i look to learn the baseball stitch? and does doing ur own taxidermy pretty expensive?
Baseball stich is basically this . Poke thru the hide from underneath pull it thru then poke thru underside of the hide on the other piece, so under, thru, under thru, it comes out looking like a neat baseball stitch ... Taxidermy CAN be expensive but mainly its your time. Its cheaper than paying a taxidermist to do it for you as long as you are good at it. If you ruin a mount it of course can be more expensive than just sending it out in the first place. . Forms can be pricey, and some tools you MUST have are pricey when you add up the bill.. But once bought you can use them over and over again. Materials can be cheap or pricey depending on how much you buy and how often you use it. Like Peeker said I wouldnt attempt a trophy until you get alot of practise in are a confidant. I personally have about 4,600.00 invested right now. It was more expensive that I figured but cheaper than some other hobbies or business would cost to start up. I guess it depends on what you would consider cheap...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sound like somthing i'm going to try and get in to. i'm trying to find out if they have a taxidermy school in rexburge idaho where i'm leaving for college next fall. i'm going to practice on some coyotes first before the bobcat. i have some hide of some coyotes and i would like to put the fur on the inside of a hooded sweatshirt but i was woundering if anybody has done this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks. i'll look in to it. does any body know any how to links on taxidermy for the heads of coyotes or babcats. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It isnt that expensive you can do a full body coyote for probably under 75 bucks, Bryan
Id like to know where you buy your forms if you can produce a lifesize coyote for under 75.00. Not counting eyes, jaw set (if open mouth), tail and ears your looking at more than 75 just for the body form, then you have to figure in tanning, and your time... How can you do it for under 75.00?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should have "pinned" this and retitled "Taxidermy How To: 101" :o j/k I've found all the group's responses fantastic and glad Youngster started the topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey i was tanning soem yotes fur and the hair was sleepin a little. what do i do to stop it? or what can i do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Youngster,If your yote hair is slipping, it probably means you missed some fat or membrane in the fleshing proccess. I don't think there is much one can do to fix it, after it starts.As for sewing, I sew any holes up after all skinning and fleshing is complete, before they go on a wire or board for drying. If your stitches are short and tight, it should be able to be tanned (you or tannery) with out any problem. I use as small a needle as I can, with artificial sinew, that has been split to a very thin diameter. I start the tare with a square knot, use a whip stitch to the other end, and finish with poking the needle half way through both edges, the taking the remainder of thread and wrapping it around the top half of the needle (pointy side) 3 times. Then pull the needle all the way through the hide and the 3 loops you made, creating a locking stitch at the and. Cut off left over,and you should be good to go.You mentioned something about salting hides, IMHO not neccessary, just get good and clean, then make taught on a wood frame or stretcher. Dry at about 55-60 degrees for several days, and they should be fine until you tan them.Best dvd I have seen is " Practicle Fur Handling" by T & M Outdoors, featuring Tom Osborne. Everything you need to know about all the steps in handling fur is here. Highly recomended!!!!Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good comments 7 Days, and welcome to the forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now