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treffryraxter

New and first smoker

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Today is the first run on the new and already modified smoker from wally world for around $40 Im going to modify this throughout the day adding the cooking pics but to tag it for the moment here is the smoker setup in the garage just in case mother nature tries to foil me.

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so prep completed just letting the chicks rest a min while I get the smoker going first up is chicks bare, then the rub, and chicks with rub.

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bucket of veg and guts going in the water pan

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You may want to think twice about your smoker being in the garage! Not only can you dangerously raise carbon monoxide levels that could migrate into your house but the smoke will chase out in a short time.

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I have no overhead protection out around the house so im leaving it just inside the door with it open ill park the truck to shield it better if it starts comin down but I do consider myself warned thanks sj

Taking those thoughts Im going to put a box fan in the garage to push the air away from the door leading towards the house. im hopin that'll be enough to keep the house from filling up with smoke I think it will be adequate and also address the Carbon Monoxide buildup if not the detector in the house should make us more than aware

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1 pm looking good at least i think

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Cool. Welcome to the world of real barbeque. You might check out some of the bbq forums for tips. I belong to the Texas BBQ forum as well as the Big Steel Keg forum. Lots to learn and lots of good folks to share info on the bbq sites. Everyone is friendly on those sites.

You might look into a large patio umbrella or just put a cover over the vent that allows side venting. Maybe a modified aluminum pie pan etc.

And get some butt in there...pork butt/shoulder. It makes for some great pulled pork sandwiches, tacos, burritos, etc. About 7-8 hrs at 300F or 12-15 hrs at 250 will get'er done. (195F internal and it'll pull nice)

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sounds awesome need to get an external temp device (the stock one is crap) it's smokin along with a prod or two from me once in a while meat probe in the chicken says it's halfway to temp and I think looking quite nice im updating with a pic now

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The Maverick cable type thermometer are the most popular with the bbq crowd. That and a Thermapen instant read to check meat temps is the standard.

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omg I ate..i mean the cat ate half the 1st chicken already :drool: the wife is gonna be soooooo pissed that poor cat he's pretty brave ill give him that Ill take pictures of chicken 2 and fixins before we dig in for dinner Im full and tired (I had a pb&j if the wife asks around) sure looked good and the cat looks like he enjoyed it

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If I see the picture correctly,

You have a walkway just outside of your garage side door,

You could keep the smoke out with the closing of the door.

Tom

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you are correct tom that is the front door porch and it "normally" receives quite a bit of water when it rains. After I had thought of it I was already cooking and of course this one time mother nature decided that particular spot was not going to be targeted by her just to rub it in. I am operating under the impression that you shouldnt try to smoke in the rain but after further thought on the pie platw suggestion I am starting to get the impression that yall are telling me as long as water is not getting inside everything will be okay. Am I wrong or is that pretty much what is being said

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I use my smoker in any weather dont make no difference to it or me lol. I do have second thoughts when it is super windy as I really hate getting out in the wind lol.

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ya I was thinking about a 4 point tie down setup in windy conditions...no more smoking in the garage for me lol. still smells like smoke but the misses doesnt seem to mind.

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Nice pics, thanks for sharing! Just wait, this gets crazy, trust me... It's a lot of fun, and you'll be doing your "tricks" & "secrets" you won't share... :D

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Now - get yourself one of these:

http://www.amazenpro...oductCode=AMNTS

Go to Smart & Final and get one or two 5lb blocks of pepperjack or cheddar sliced up in 1/2lb squares and cold smoke it using oak, mesquite or whatever is your favorite pellets for 3-4 hours. Let it age a week or so in the fridge before eating, and your wife will be bugging you to smoke some more before it runs out. Smoked pepperjack shredded on tacos is awesome, but we use it for everything. It's gotten to the point where my wife turns up her nose at regular cheese now.

We are in the perfect season for smoking cheese.

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The sky's the limit dude! In the summer time I cook just about everything on the BBQ! My favorite desert is grilled peaches with grated ginger, super delicious!!! And they're good for you too. I'm addicted to grilling.

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IDK, give it a shot. Never heard of anyone using it, but that doesn't mean it ain't worth a try.

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Here is a list of woods for smoking that may interest all the other smokers on the site.

Alder

Very delicate with a hint of sweetness

Good with fish, pork, poultry, and light-meat game birds. Traditionally used in the pacific Northwest to smoke Salmon.

Almond

A nutty and sweet smoke flavour, light ash.

Good with all meats.

Apple

Slightly sweet but denser, fruity smoke flavour.

Beef, poultry, game birds, pork (particularly ham).

Apricot

The flavour is milder and sweeter than Hickory

Good with most meats.

Ash

Fast burner, light but distinctive flavour.

Good with fish and red meats.

Birch

Medium hard wood with a flavour similar to maple.

Good with pork and poultry.

Cherry

Slightly sweet, fruity smoke flavour

Good with all meats.

Chestnut

Slightly sweet nutty smoke flavour

Good with most meats.

Grape vines

Aromatic, similar to fruit wood.

Good with most meats.

Hickory

Pungent, smoky, bacon-like flavour. The most common wood used.

Good for all smoking, especially pork and ribs.

Lemon

Medium smoke flavour with a hint of fruitiness.

Excellent with beef, pork and poultry.

Lilac

Very light, subtle with a hint of floral.

Good with seafood and lamb.

Maple

Mildly smoky, somewhat sweet flavour.

Good with pork, poultry, cheese, vegetables and small game birds.

Mesquite

Strong earthy flavour.

Good with most meats, especially beef and most vegetables.

Mulberry

The smell is sweet and reminds one of apple

Beef, poultry,game birds, pork (particularly ham).

Nectarine

The flavour is milder and sweeter than hickory

Good on most meats.

Oak

One of the most popular wood's, Heavy smoke flavour.

Good with red meat, pork, fish and heavy game.

Olive

The smoke favour is similar to mesquite, but distinctly lighter.

Delicious with poultry.

Orange

Medium smoke flavour with a hint of fruitiness.

Excellent with beef, pork and poultry.

Peach

Slightly sweet, woodsy flavour.

Good with most meats.

Pear

Slightly sweet, woodsy flavour.

Poultry, game birds and pork.

Pecan

Similar to hickory, but not as strong. Try smoking with the shells as well.

Good for most needs

Plum

The flavour is milder and sweeter than hickory

Good with most meats.

Walnut

Very heavy smoke flavour, usually mixed with lighter woods like pecan or apple. Can be bitter if used alone.

Good with red meats and game.

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On the mesquite, my take after using it for couple years now, is that it's good with beef...if you like a strong pungent flavor. I use it only with beef, but I think it would be good with lamb and probably wild game like deer, antelope, elk, etc. But, I personally wouldn't recommend it on veggies or fish or chicken, nor pork. With veggies, i'm not a fan of any smoke, myself.

So, the thing about mesquite is that a little goes a long way. It's one of my favorites for beef.

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glad I already have this thread tagged :bleh[1]: otherwise I would forget where that list of wood is thanks for posting it and Ill most definitely be referencing it in the future, I have a question though: If a tree falls down..say an oak tree..and I have a chain saw can I cut it up and use it to smoke right away or is there a certain amount of time I should leave the wood exposed to cure in the sun?

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Just by reading this I have started looking at smokers online. Im definitely gonna get me one.

treffryraxter: how did your $40 smoker from wal mart work out?

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You can do the same thing with a regular full sized Weber. Just build your coals on one side and make sure it's a small fire. Then put your meat on the opposite side of the grill. When you put the lid on make sure the vent is over the meat so the smoke draws across it. I mainly cook indirect heat on the Weber using this method. I pull the big drum out from time to time. But I've found that I can get about the same results with my grill.

Steaks and burgers ALWAYS go over direct flame. Pork, chops or loin, gets seared over the coals then finish on the "cool" side.

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Chicken turned out great you just have to watch your temp starting out and look into the after market modifications they have online like switching the legs, drilling holes in your coal pan, and also I would reccomend a better thermometer and remote meat thermometer but it is a fairly user friend setup

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Remote thermometers are the bomb! Since getting one I can't remember how I functioned before... :

;)

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