Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Kephers

How do you set up your dies for a reloading session?

16 posts in this topic

Assuming you have a single stage press, what I do is put the case holder on the press. Then insert the die for decapping. I have mine preset. To full length every time. The one I'm more interested in is your bullet seating die.

When I set mine in, I insert the die and back it out. Insert the empty case, place bullet and press down on the lever all the way, bring it down, measure it. Adjust die as needed till COAL is as close to target as possible. Normally about 3-4 times I can get my COAL on target then tighten the nut around the die with a crescent wrench so it doesnt back out. Thats how I do mine.

How do you guys do yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your seating die should be pre-set as well. Just use the small screw and nut on the top for the proper depth. By adjusting the die itself deeper you can damage the brass. The only brass I have damaged was with the seating die by being set improperly, never with a sizing die. I also never use a wrench on the dies, I preset the allen screw in the locking nut and just screw them in finger tight. I could be doing it wrong? But its worked for Me fairly well. JMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the same problem that I had with Grant's 44mag reloads,

I think we figured out that his cylinders were a little bigger than mine.

Also, see if it does the same thing with a different powder.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom, I believe he is referring only to the seating die and how to set and adjust it for depth. What we had to adjust was the depth of the resizing die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pretty much do it the same way, and the die never gets adjusted again unless I change the mold (I cast for everything I shoot). But - sometimes I need to readjust the seating die for two separate bullet lengths, like my 30-30 for silhouette.

I shoot a 170 grain for everything except chickens, which is a 115 grain. In that case, I have one of each on the reloading bench pre-made, so I back out the seater, put a pre-seated round in the press, raise it up and screw the seater down until it touches. Good to go for the rest of the loading quick and easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's how I do mine.

I first raised the ram up with the case on it. I then screw the seater die into the press unit the case mouth comes in contact with the crimp shoulder of the die. Back it out one complete turn and secure the die with it's locking ring. Next, find your bullet seating depth using tools like Lock N Load OAL Gauge or just make your own dummy round for the bullet you intend to shoot on your rifle. If you want to use more than one bullet, then make a dummy round for each one. Put your dummy round away and referenced it every time you load. I won't touch my die again until I load a new batch of bullet.

By the way, I established my seating depth by measuring the length through the bullet ogive rather than the COAL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first question would have to be: Are you referring to rifle or pistol rounds? Adjusting the seating die for a pistol will also change the crimp and is just one of the reasons why I use a seperate seating and crimping die for pistol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So in other words DF.. your seating die is set, and you dont change the Die for the COL ? You adjust it with the seating stem?

Correct!

I also never use a wrench on the dies, I preset the allen screw in the locking nut and just screw them in finger tight.

Grant, it's better to tightened it a bit using wrench or something unless you have a good grip. :crazy: I always found mine loose after I'm done reloading necessitating running the loaded round through the seater once again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the same as most.

Resizing die I set once. I have "2" 220 Swifts and "2" .223's...among others. Each has their own die set w/shell holder. I set them once to bump the shoulder back .002". They are now set for each individual chamber.

Seating die is set the same way DF describes, then adjusted for different bullets with the stem. I too measure bullets from the ogive. I use a stoney point tool for the various different calibers. I record maximum length for different bullet/caliber/rifle combos and adjust accordingly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when I set up my dies for the 357 sig ,i got a hornady headspace gauge set (Tawnoper.s suggestion) ,so i could adjust the shoulder to only bump it back .002. BEST money i spent , as you can set all your dies up quickly and accurately. Once i find a seating depth that works for me , I seat an empty sized case with the pellet and put it in the box with the dies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct!

Grant, it's better to tightened it a bit using wrench or something unless you have a good grip. :crazy: I always found mine loose after I'm done reloading necessitating running the loaded round through the seater once again.

Thanks for the tip DF.. I have never had one feel loose as of yet, but I will keep better watch on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was referring to rifle rounds. I thought about doing a dummy round but have just never done it. Guess I'll have to give it a try. I make the die snug with a wrench. Sometimes it gets loose so I just tighten it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of these posts were directed at rifle rounds. Its just that if you are changing the DIE to adjust COL its probably the wrong way to accomplish it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget to make sure your COAL will fit your rifle magazine, unless you don't mind loading your rifle one cartridge at a time. :signbummer8tl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah I never have that issue. But I only load maybe 3 rounds max in any rifle I own. But to be honest if it takes more than 1 shot then I messed up and probably shouldnt have taken the shot in the first place. At the range however its normally 1 at a time anyway. Occasionally 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0