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ratassassin

Remington 700 VSSF .22-250

35 posts in this topic

Looks like you hit the mother lode, Mike. Excellent accuracy AND High velocity with a 50 gr bullet. Varmints & predators beware! :eck05: and Thanks for sharing

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Nice group...do it again, and again lol. Just kidden. Now I'd look for consistency. Try shooting a 10 shot group.Just wondering though...although 3450fps will definitely get the job done, it seems a little light for a 50gr bullet out of that caliber. My Swift, which is just a little bit hotter than a 22-250, shoots the same bullet (50gr vmax) right around 3900fps. My 22-250 will shoot a 55gr around 3500fps.

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OOPS... While I knew you were shooting a 250, Mike, for some reason I had 223 on my mind when I was typing . :eck05: Man, I am transposing or screwing up more like that the older I get. So yeah, Ed, nice catch and yes the velocity is on the low side. My 50 gr Nosler loads chrono an avg of 3915 fps from my 26", 22-250. And yes, I got this one right.... this time. lolMike, I know you want to extend barrel life, and who doesn't, but often times on any given caliber, best accuracy can be obtained on the lightest load, and then again at Maximum load. Seen it often! Just depends where one wants it at of course. Still an excellent job though B)

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In the Hodgdon reloading data center they show the min load for 22-250, 50 gr bullet 34.5 gr of Varget at 3596 fps, Max with a 50 gr bullet is 37.5 gr of Varget at 3834 fps.For coyotes I wouldn't worry about barrel life. Even if you hunt coyotes quite a bit you won't shoot that many shells in a year at coyotes.

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Well gents, it did seem a bit slow to me, too. I know Hodgdon's data is hotter. But I went with Hornady's published load data in the 7th edition (since they made the bullet) which recommends a minimum of 31.8 gr Varget and max of 36.4 grains. At 34.6 grains, my load is a bit faster than the mid-point between the two.Hornady's manual says 34.6 grains will do 3600 fps with a 26" barrel and 1:14 twist like my VSSF. But my chrony results with 10 shots showed that the average muzzle velocity with this load is actually 3465 fps, quite a bit slower. Not too long ago, I compared my chron's results to an Oehler and it's spot on. So I don't know what to say, but that's the load I ended up with that prints consistent sub-half inch groups at 100 yards in my gun.So I'll stick with this for now. I'm going to shoot it next at 200 and 300 yards to see if it stays tight. Assuming it does, I'm going to turn my attention to working up a lead free load for it, then get out and hunt.

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This is just a IMO...but, the reloading manuals recommended loads are just that...recommended. They are meant to get you in the ballpark. That's why they say to start low and work your way up.I remember when I got my first Chronograph. Was shooting my 22-250 thru it and according to the manual I should of been right about 3600...my first shot thru it read 3300, second shot was about the same. Here I was for the last 5 years shooting a seriously overbore .223. In all honesty I should of known...and was always kind of wondering due to the case not showing any real signs of pressure. I gradually bumped it up a couple grains over manual max and got the velocity I should have without any real bad pressure signs. A slightly large chamber or a slightly small chamber will really change pressure and velocity.If I'm shooting a 22-250, I want 22-250 velocity. I don't want one shooting .223 velocities hoping to shorten barrel rot (it won't). Kind of a waste of powder.Again...JMO.

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the reloading manuals recommended loads are just that...recommended.... according to the manual I should of been right about 3600...my first shot thru it read 3300, second shot was about the same.
True'r words were never spoken. Too many folks get hung up on manuals as being Gospel, and they are NOT. Actual velocities can, & do vary by a LOT sometimes. I have chrono'd or seen chrono'd a specific load through 2 or more different rifles with as much as 300+ fps difference; semi often! I've shown this to older folks (like me) at the range, only to see their jaw nearly break when hitting the bench. It's like, REALLY? They've been doing this how long & didn't know? My friend Badcoyote's 223 gets 200 fps higher velocity than my 223 with the same load. And is why I hate him! LOL (j.k.) In other words, my very respectable 223, 40gr Nosler load at just under 3800 fps, is right at 4,000 fps from his 223. And his rifle is INSANELY accurate to boot. My 35 gr Nosler lead free is 100 fps faster than the 40gr, & 300 fps faster than the 40gr from my 250. I've said this before, but will say it again. IMO, the Nosler & Hodgdon reloading "GUIDES" are two of the best going & are closest to actual #'s, in terms of accuracy & velocities. And I've owned / own most of them AND their numerous editions... Lynman, Hornady, Speer, Handloader magazine/pet loads etc.Good stuff / thread

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A load that shoots a 50-grain bullet a consistent .4 MOA doesn't strike me as a waste of powder, especially when it's doing close to 3500 fps. That's good enough for now, and I want to move on to lead free. I tested loads up to Hornady's recommended maximum of 35.6 grains Varget but they were less accurate, producing groups closer to .75 or .80 MOA. I had decided to go with Hornady's manual since they designed the bullet I'm using, and Hodgdon's Varget load for a .224 50 grainer was for a different bullet, the Sierra SPT 1330. I checked the Sierra manual but Sierra's published loads for the SPT 1330 50 grain bullet with Varget were closer to Hornady's V-Max 50 gr numbers, ranging from minimum 33 grains Varget to 36 grains max. So I figured it was safer to start my tests within Hornady's guidelines. I'm sure you guys are right that at the higher range of Hodgdon's recommended velocities great accuracy can be found. But for me starting out with a new caliber and a firearm I hadn't previously fired, it seemed much safer to go with the bullet manufacturer's recommendations. Now I've got a very accurate, reliable and safe load that hopefully won't burn up my barrel too quickly. I'm pretty happy about that.From what I've read, one of the nice things about .22-250 is that it's very flexible and can be loaded accurately at faster or slower velocities. That's certainly been my experience with it so far and I'm sure I'll explore the higher velocity capabilities of this caliber at some point. Thanks again for your input.

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Coyotes prefer to be shot with haul a$$ 22-250 bullets! LOL

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A load that shoots a 50-grain bullet a consistent .4 MOA doesn't strike me as a waste of powder, especially when it's doing close to 3500 fps.
Cool. And I agree. If you're happy with it, that's all that matters.From a hunting stand point and most shots you'll take...doesn't matter in the slightest. A critter wouldn't know what hit em. 3400-3500fps is no joke. For a lot of years I never knew what fps my stuff was going and actually didn't really care. Never even shot groups or was concerned with group sizes...I'd pick a load from the book, load up a 100 rounds, sight them in with 3 shots on a cardboard box and go hunt. Simple simon and it worked. Sometimes I'd even mix/match loads and bullets. Whatever I had at the time. I still do the same sometimes. Calling coyotes or jump shooting jacks, I grab whatever I have loaded at the time. Doesn't really matter.But, since this discussion took off in a more technical aspect I was commenting to that fact. A .223 tops out with a 50gr bullet pretty close to 3400 fps neighborhood but with about 7-8 grains less powder then a 22-250 shooting the same bullet/velocity. That would be about an extra 50-60 rounds per pound of powder if you were shooting a .223. And that lower powder charge in a .223 shooting the same velocity is going to be easier in the same size tube...which will help prolong barrel life.A 22-250 was developed for velocity. It takes off were the .223 ends...if you let it. With just a couple more grains of powder investment you'll be taking advantage of what it's all about.

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