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seebass

Ive got a $1000 for a new rifle, and acces.

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Here are a few I'm looking at, REM 700 vtr atacs camo for $670REM 700 vtr $760REM 700 sps varmint $530, sps tac $620. Those are a few for starters..... Help me, I'm struggling! I'm going next weekend, if I don't by online.... Anyone buy online?They are all in .223

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Wow, mostly personal taste isn't it? Get whatever one YOU like in other words.Ok, with that said, out of those choices you listed the sps is my pick. NOT the tactical either, as those are best left for the military IMO. Hey, you asked, right? Oh, & of course ALL predator rifles would come with 26" barrels if I was dictator, or ? LOL The down side is, by the time I would be finished with the sps, it would be well over $1,000. Can't help it, being a recovering Remmy junkie. Where's Grant when I need him? lolAnyway, doubt if you can go wrong with any of them, so Good Luck and Happy hunting

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Thanks for the quick response! So is your choice the sps because its "bare" and loaded with upgrade capabilities? I'm not sure ill be doing much to whatever I get. 26" is a speed thing right? So with no upgrades would you stay standard sps?

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If you get the SPS Carlos, I sure hope it has a better action than mine. The one I have scratches the heck out of the brass, the cycling of the bolt feels gritty as well. And from lots of reports that I have read Lots of SPS's are this way. Maybe you will get lucky and get a smooth one? If you are intent on a Remington, Id look at an older one in good shape. Go try a few out. Cycle the bolt, and if you can tell them to cycle some rounds through as well. The feeding from the Magazine is very rough on Mine. Then try a Howa, Savage, Tikka,CZ action to compare how they feel. Good luck.

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If your thinking of buying online I would look at buds gunshop I have bought two pistols and a shotgun from them they are a really good company and take care of you.

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The sps can be upgraded or used as is will be fine. And you are correct in that the 26" barrel is for speed (that I get high on/lol). Again, out of the limited choices you list, yes the sps would still be my personal choice.Grant is correct on the action be a bit "rough" compared to some of their other models, but that does not matter to me much. Accuracy and speed are my primary concerns, so the rough action may be more of personal like or dislike? Maybe?Good Luck

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Consider looking at the savage accutrigger models too. You will get superb accuracy at a low cost, leaving you enough room to get good optics too.

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Hey Grant, always a great idea to try something out before buying, however, not sure what the concerns about the sps are?Reason I say that is, friends & I own at least 3 sps & they all shoot incredibly accurate. In fact Badcoyote's (upgraded) sps 223 with factory barrel is insanely accurate & I would put up against any custom barreled sporter/hunting rifle. I know of at least 1 of his targets with all 5 shots in a single 1/8" hole. I believe it was posted last year on here, but could be wrong on that.

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I'd save up and get a Remington 700 VSSF II with stainless steel fluted heavy barrel and HS Precision stock. The X-Mark Pro trigger would be fine for now but if you wanted to upgrade later, you could install a Jewell and drop the pull to 1 lb. or less. If I got an SPS, I'd get the SPS Varmint with 26" heavy, round barrel but change out the injection molded plastic stock to HS Precision or Bell & Carlson Medalist and free float the barrel. "The obvious place that Remington saved money was in the stock. It is an injection molded plastic stock like you would find on a low end Savage rifle. It is fairly flimsy and the fit and finish on it is pretty poor, especially where the recoil pad mates to the stock, as you can see in some of the pictures below. In all honesty though, the shape isn't too bad. The wide forend works well on sandbags. The pistol grip area is pretty thin and not nearly as comfortable as other tactical or varmint stocks, and the cheek piece area is thin also, but the semi Monte Carlo cheek piece does help support your cheek fairly well. The tactile feel has been aided in the gripping areas of the stock with some roughed up surface, and it does help. The stock does have two sling swivel studs on the forend which is a very common tactical setup, though I suspect it would be useful for varmint hunting as well. There are no pillars or bedding block of any sort, though one would not expect one on this stock or rifle with its price point. The single biggest problem with the stock, at least in my eyes, is that the barrel is not free floating. In reality, the injection molded stocks, even with the strengthening ribs inside, are just not strong enough to effectively free float a barrel (yes, I know Savage does it). The manufacturing tolerances and warping of the plastic are also additional problems when trying to free float the barrel. While these may be good reasons why the barrel on this rifle is not free floated, it does not mean that it is a good thing. I expect (and I tested it to find out for sure) that some additional accuracy could be achieved with a stock that had some good bedding, aluminum or glass, and a free floated barrel." http://www.snipercentral.com/remspsv.htm

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I agree with Mike, on getting the SPS Varmint model... and is the one a couple friends and I have.

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don't get in to big a hurry, shop for some used, just bought a model 21 cooper for a 1000, may be 300 hundred rounds through it. have fun stephen

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Hey Grant, always a great idea to try something out before buying, however, not sure what the concerns about the sps are?
He already told you what the problem is the action is rough.It sounds like your stuck on Remington being the best thing out there.The problem I see with them is they don't offer a adjustable trigger like other manufacturer's .You spend all this money on a rifle then on top of it have to go out and spend more money on a trigger job.

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I have a bunch of Rem 700 rifles but if I wanted to just buy a 223 Rem bolt action rifle and go hunting with it the way you bought it I would buy a Tikka T-3. The 1-8" twist that the Tikka's have will let you shoot more bullet weights also.

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He already told you what the problem is the action is rough.
No kidding? I meant if there were other issues that Grant had with the sps. I cannot recall seeing any scratched brass on 3 sps's friends & I shoot. Doesn't necessarily mean it doesn't do it, I just don't recall it is all. But I'm not always very observant either
It sounds like your stuck on Remington being the best thing out there.
Wow... You catch on quick! How many YEARS have I been saying that? Never mind, it's retorical question.
You spend all this money on a rifle then on top of it have to go out and spend more money on a trigger job.
Didn't know $530 was a LOT of money for a centerfire rifle. Oh well!SPS was just my opinion or choice of the 4 rifles Carlos was interested in. Good or bad (how my choice was)

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Buy a Rem then throw away everything but the action. Then have the action blueprinted/a new tigger/new custom barrel/new McMillian stock bedded and recoil pad/scope mount and rings with a good scope and you are ready to use it. You will need more than $1000.OR ----Buy a Tikka or Savage put a good scope on it and you are ready to go. You will spend $1000 or less.AND they will probably shoot just about the same. :sport037fn4:

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I sold my Rem700 that I had built up and bought 2 Tikka's. I am happy as a clam, had been doing some shooting around my property but finally got them to the range yesterday, and ran some lead through them, this 223 is amazing! Great accuracy, was sighted in after 2 shots! Easily sub moa, with cheap-o ammo. Gonna try loading up some v-max's and see what this thing can really do.

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Well, I have to confess, I like Tikkas and Savages too. Especially like my Tikka T-3 Lite in .223 Remington which is accurate as heck with 65 grain Sierra Gamekings. But I prefer the Rem 700's for heavy barreled varmint and tactical rifles.

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Buy a Rem then throw away everything but the action. Then have the action blueprinted/a new tigger/new custom barrel/new McMillian stock bedded and recoil pad/scope mount and rings with a good scope and you are ready to use it. You will need more than $1000.OR ----Buy a Tikka or Savage put a good scope on it and you are ready to go. You will spend $1000 or less.AND they will probably shoot just about the same. :rofl2:
:bleh[1]: smoke is going to come out of franks ears now ................

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I don't own a Tikka but as I understand they are owned and built by Sako, who IMO make about the best production rifle going.If it is true (Tikka/Sako) you couldn't go wrong with a Tikka...or save up a few more dollars and buy a Sako.Not putting any of the other Mfg's down...I own a most of the mfgs offerings and like them all... but they do not compare to a Sako.

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:D smoke is going to come out of franks ears now
LOL... Yeah no kidding... Now I have to take my Remmingtons in for councling. Poor things!

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So I've narrowed it down to 2 rifles. The REM 700 sps varmint, or the savage 12 both in .223. I'm going on Saturday to feel how they cycle and feel. Why is the 9 twist better than the 12?

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To stabilize the bigger grain bullets that's one reason some people like 1-8 or 1-9 twist rates .If you plan on shooting light bullets then the 1-12 would be ok .I

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