Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
KNOCKED UP

Vmax Bullets

40 posts in this topic

There ya go, Fox... I do agree, especially with our different needs on your last paragraph.I do want to address the wind, which again effects your situation more than mine. First, many predator hunters try & avoid hunting in the wind for the most part. Exceptions to everything of course. 2nd, lets take my coyote at 400 yards and have him running broadside from right to left on our pc. The lighter & faster bullet will arrive on target much sooner than the 87 gr will; a Big plus! A perfect example of that is the coyote in my avatar & is exactly what happened. Ok, I admit that was a semi lucky shot, but I was sure glad I was shooting a really f a s t bullet at that time. Anyway, you are correct, we really are talking about our two different needs / types of hunting. Sorry if I got carried away... Regards :smiley-outta-here: Eric, you know you're killing me. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a cool discussion. I find these much more interesting than a lot of the "smoke a yote" posts.My first real center fire rifle was a 6mm Rem. Bought it at 14 years old with paper route money and help from my dad. I still own it. Ruger 77.I hunted exclusively with that rifle till I was in my early 20's...it was all I had. My one and only load consisted of IMR4350 and a 80gr Speer Hot-kore or the 85gr Sierra Spitzer. I cannot remember how many jackrabbits, coyotes, vermin and other stuff fell to that rifle. Quite a few deer as well. Never got too fancy trying different loads and stuff...load up, sight in and go hunting. I doubt any of the misses I had with that rifle was due to the fact of which bullet I was using. Anyway, obviously I like the 6mm.I can see both sides of the story in regard to Frank and Desert Fox. For long range stuff, BC rules. Period. The longer the distance the more it comes into play. The more wind you have to deal with, the more it comes into play. At longer distance the heavier, sleeker bullet will retain more velocity and eventually catch and pass a lighter bullet. The biggest advantage with BC to me is wind...but for hunting and shooting at common distances you want a flat shooting death ray...and velocity is the main way to go for that. The thing about the heavier high bc vld bullets is a lot of standard barrels will not stabilize them or shoot them worth a darn, but they will stabilize and shoot the lighter ones real well. Most guys who have a special tube installed on their rig do so so they can take advantage of high bc bullets are are not interested in shooting light bullets.While I hardly ever shoot at stuff much beyond 300yds without a bench/sandbags...just for the sake of conversation: 350yds (a pretty good field distance)While I like the lighter 58gr vmax for the 6mm I prefer something with a little more smack and better bc downrange. The 75gr is about perfect IMO. With the 58 loaded about 3900fps and the 75 at about 3400 they are within about an inch of each other out to 350yds (58 is slightly flatter) but the 75 has caught up to it in retained velocity. And the 75 has about a 2.5" less drift in a 10mph wind and hits with about 200 more pounds of energy. I like the 75 better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was never really sold to the concept when Nosler first came out with the 55 grain bullet for the 243/6MM. I figured, at over 4,000 fps of velocity, in a fast 10 twist barrel, the rotational torque imparted on the bullet at such a high RPM would render it so inaccurate and worst, probably would blow-up before it get to the target. We're talking about in the neighborhood of 300,000 RPM here. Obviously I was wrong since I haven't heard nor read any complaint. But I'll bet it's hard to make this bullet shoot accurately at full 4000 fps+ velocity. Can any of you share your thought and experienced with the 55 here. Thanks,DF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have shot some sierra 55 grain blitz kings hovering around the 4000 mark. Very accurate, deadly on coyotes. I choose them for a highly frangible load around houses /livestock. If I shot in much wind ,or areas that had little to worry about I would shoot the 70s. I do shoot some 69 grain Berger bullets that are absolutely the best coyote bullet I have ever shot. Never exits and match grade accuracy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is the 69 versus a 75 grain accu-tippost-755-1332214721.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I figured, at over 4,000 fps of velocity, in a fast 10 twist barrel, the rotational torque imparted on the bullet at such a high RPM would render it so inaccurate and worst, probably would blow-up before it get to the target.
I had the exact opposite results from the very first get go with 58gr V-max's in my first .243. It was an H&R single shot, and from the first loads with Varget or H4895 it was a one hole clover leaf shooter (at 100 yards). That gun accounted for more rabbits in a couple of years than all the coyotes in the world. The action eventually failed though (opened after firing) and was sent in and they fixed the action and replaced the barrel despite my begging them not to. The new one shot well, albeit not as well as the original, but still MOA. Plus, by then I had already replaced it with my Howa. The Howa also shot the 58gr pills well, but I had decided to load it heavier for deer, pig, and the occasional coyote. That was before the lead ban, and I have since moved back down to 60gr Sierra HP's (just for small game), and they are like rocket sleds on rails. Straight, fast, and true.Heavy bullets have their place (deer, pig, etc.), but I have found that small for caliber bullets have their place too, when used correctly. The speed really shine on running rabbits, where the least amount of lead you need the better. And I gladly trade the less lead for the extra couple hundred FPE, as I have never needed 800 FPE or more to kill a little rabbit or a 40lb coyotes :) .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caught in a bind. I recieved my Hornady 87 gr v max. Now I am having a real hard time find any load data. I have checked Hornady, speers, and Hogden. I just can't find any load data for the 87 gr v max for a243 win. useing IMR4350Any ideas?Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Any ideas?
I told you already... send 'em back for the 55 grainers. You're killing me! :roflmao3[1]: Ok, fine... Let me go take an aspirin, sleep a little, think about this, and come back. Hopefully! :pot:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Caught in a bind. I recieved my Hornady 87 gr v max. Now I am having a real hard time find any load data. I have checked Hornady, speers, and Hogden. I just can't find any load data for the 87 gr v max for a243 win. useing IMR4350Any ideas?Tom
Tom according to My Nosler book, they show a starting weight of 39.5 up to 43.5 for 85-90 gr bullets. It also showed that in their rifle the starting load was more accurate. Im sure you would be safe with the starting load. This is for their Baliistic tip bullet that is pretty compatible with The V Max.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Ruger tang safety M77 in 6mmRem tries to put the 55gr Noslers into the same hole. The ones that do not are real close(like almost touching) and that is because of an old shooter with a 3X9 scope. Of course this 6mmRem rifle also does about the same with all other varmit and hunting bullets I have tried including 100gr ones. I do not shoot target bullets at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Nosler reloading manual is hands down my favorite reloading source, with Hodgdon website being a close 2nd for me. With that said, it appears that a MAX charge of 44.5 grs of IMR 4831 was the most accurate powder & one of the highest velocities obtained with the 85-90 gr bullets in their test rifles. That of course may, or may not mean anything for your rifle. I know I don't need to say start below max, but will anyhow. lolAs I mentioned earlier above, I am pretty sure that IMR 4831 was one of, if not my favorite powder when I had my 243 many years ago. I also remember doing a fair amout of shooting with bullets from 85-105 grains. So, with all that said, IMR 4831 would definitely be one of the (first) powders that I would be testing with that bullet and caliber.Good Luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will be perfectly safe using the 90gr load data from Hodgdon's website. Since the 87gr bullets are lighter (albeit only slightly) they will actually handle just a hair more powder than the 90gr bullets. So even a max load from the 90gr data will not quite be a max load for the 87gr. But always work up to it, obviously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive had execellent results with the 87 gr vmax to the tune of 6 outta six DRT from 80 yds to 319 yds. they have a high BC and have great knock down power on coyotes.With the exception of the last one I shot the rest were with the 87 gr. vmax.105 amax a good one as well coyotes dont like either one thats for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0