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BullsEye

Couple new to me shotguns.

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A friend of mine doesn't shoot and decided to give me a couple of his grandfathers shotguns he inherited. They look like nice guns but I was looking to find some information on them if anyone is familiar with them.The first is a Joseph Lang and Son side by side 12 gauge with 30 inch barrels and I believe a damascus receiver with some engraving on it. I can tell that this was a hunting gun as it has nicks on the cheek weld and holes for a sling I imagine on the butt end only. It was built in London but I am not sure on its value or if it is in shooting condition. It does have some burnt powder in the barrel that was never cleaned out that is at least 4 years old (My friend never fired them) I would like to get it up and running if it isn't already. The second is a Remington semi auto Sportsman 48 and the grip has a vinyl pheasant engraving on it. It seems more modern and in working condition but I don't know much about it either.Would love some information on these two if you have any.I will try to post pictures up soon.Thanks.

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Take them to a good gunsmith for a complete checkup and any needed repairs. They can also give you a value on them.

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I've never seen a gun with a damascus receiver but if it really does have one I'd be willing to bet that it was probably a high grade gun in its day and the barrels are probably damascus too which would put it in wall hanger status unless a guy was willing to send it to Europe to have it proofed. The bad part is that if it fails the proof test the gun blows up and you get back a bunch of pieces. Really need pics to see what you're dealing with.

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I've never seen a gun with a damascus receiver but if it really does have one I'd be willing to bet that it was probably a high grade gun in its day and the barrels are probably damascus too which would put it in wall hanger status unless a guy was willing to send it to Europe to have it proofed. The bad part is that if it fails the proof test the gun blows up and you get back a bunch of pieces. Really need pics to see what you're dealing with.
I am starting to think that its just discolored bluing instead of damascus after I stated cleaning them up. They both look like they are or where good work guns as they are clearly used. I will try to get picture of them up tonight after work.

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The Remington Sportsman 48 was made from 1948 till 1968. the gas system used an adjustable exhaust in the barrel nut. Its marked H&L for High and Low Base .[ target and dove loads are low base]. the adjustment made them easily adjustable for most ammo. I have my dads that he bought in 1950. the only thing odd about these is do not add any oil to the gas piston or cylinder. It needs to run dry or it will foul quickly. if you want to add accessory barrels any from the 870 family will fit with the addition of two gas ports that are easily drilled. dads came with a 30" goose barrel, and I added a 26" Remchoke barrel, from a wingmaster. its made it a very handy shotgun. I beleave it shares its trigger assembly with the 11-48 and 11-87 guns. Its the only semi auto shotgun Ive owned but it served my dad well and Im now enjoying it. DR

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I am starting to think that its just discolored bluing instead of damascus after I stated cleaning them up. They both look like they are or where good work guns as they are clearly used. I will try to get picture of them up tonight after work.
Ok, that's probably case coloring. Don't get too aggressive cleaning it. Once you loose case coloring it can't be put back without spending a lot of money. The old case color jobs were done right with either a bunch of heat or a cyanide bath. The new chemical jobs don't hold up as well and a real bone charcoal job costs a lot of money to have done.

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That side buy side does not look like a damascas. Might be a good a shooter and that auto is begging for some camo and wants to blast some coyotes.

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Oh boy, I am sooooo jealous! You have a very nice British double there. Most dedicated double gun shooters go their whole lives without having a gun like that fall into their lap. :lol: Due to the fact that it is very old it probably has short 2 9/16ths chambers that were the norm in guns sold in America or most likely it will have even shorter 2 1/2 inch chambers that were the standard in Europe. Either way, even if a smith gives it a clean bill of health be sure to feed it loads that are in line with the loads that were popular during the timeframe of when the gun was made. You really need to find the date of manufacture so you can see if it even falls into the smokeless powder era. It very well could be meant to be used with black powder cartridges. And if you are new to doubles, never do the one handed John Wayne method of snapping the action shut. Use two hands and use your thumb to keep the lever from snapping to the left when the action closes. Right now the lever sits "right of center" and that is the way you want it to stay. Letting the gun snap shut will accelerate wear and cause the lever to eventually rest "left of center" and you don't want that. Also, when you reassemble the gun after a cleaning never let the forearm snap againced the barrels. Lower it down carefully. This will prevent the forearm from cracking.

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Never get red of that side by side. Its a piece of history. Put it in a safe and worship it...Did you get the original case with it. It would make the price go way up.. That thang is worth some money. And not just hundreds. I would get it appraised...

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When I was a kid I asked my dad why he always used a side by side. His answer was "because a fine bird like a pheasant deserves better than to be shot with a pump". :lol:

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Thanks guys for the replies. I also contacted Atkins Grant and Lang the manufacturers of the shotgun about getting it checked out by a smith and I am hoping that they refer me to someone soon. I also asked if they could tell me anything about the shotgun as well. I will keep you updated with any news.

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Well I found out that it was built in 1905 the barrels are improved cylinder and full. It is missing some gold inlay probably due to the great depression. It shoots great! I took it trap shooting after a smith, Jim Thynne of Ivory Bead gave it a clean bill of health and what a fun gun to shoot. Jims a great guy and really helped me a lot. I recommend if your interested in a nice double rifle or shotgun to give him a call or check out his website.

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Cool! What chamber length did it end up having? If memory serves correctly 1924 was when the 2 3/4 chamber became standard due to the then new star crimped shells. And remember, doubles need a little grease here and there, never use oil other than to wipe down the outside of the gun. If oil is used to lube the action it will eventually migrate to the stock and soften the wood.

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The gun was built for 2 1/2 inch shells however I was given the OK to use 2 3/4 low base shells with 1oz or less of lead. Thanks for the info on the oil. :signgreatreport3kg:

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That's a piece of side by side is a fine gun. Do yourself a favor and don't get it appraised it may make it hard to keep. I used to work for a guy and he hunted with all old antique side by sides like that and it would make your head spin the kind of money that people will drop on guns like that.

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