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Yateswell

Nosler 40 gr. lead free bt bullet

32 posts in this topic

A chronograph has way too many attributes for even the most basic reloader to dismiss. I wouldn't knock one if you haven't used one. A necessity...no. But neither is a computer...or a cell phone.They make sorting out reloads much easier and effective.I went a long time without one myself. Loaded up a ton of rounds that went boom no problem. Once I started using one I wondered why I didn't get one earlier. If they were expensive like an Oehler I'd say too much moola for the recreational shooter...but they make some very affordable ones nowadays.

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I wouldn't knock one if you haven't used one.
Nobody's knocking them, just simply stating that a vast majority of people would be better off learning to shoot better rather than learning how fast a bullet is traveling. I did say they do have there place for a select few, but for almost every hunter who has ever pulled the trigger, 200-300 fps even, will make little difference worth noting. And way too many rely upon the speed alone as being a source of pressure. Not so. Just saying that WHERE you hit is much more important than how fast it is being hit. And way too many worry more about the wrong one. Not saying anyone in particular does, but one trip to a public range with your ears open will tell you the sad truth that most shooters (and reloaders) are more concerned how fast they are shooting and not how WELL they are shooting. One should learn to shoot first. Then learn to reload. Then worry about speed and shot to shot consistency. Sadly, most don't do this. That's all I'm saying.

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Most of us started reloading to save money... yeah right! At least that's how most of us perceived reloading in the beginning. For some of us however, we pick up reloading because we want maximum performance for our shooting iron... factory ammo just don't cut it. We expect our hand load to be very consistent, accurate and at maximum velocity for maximum terminal performance on game. With that said, I will tell you why chronograph is necessary in both persuasion as I stated in my previous post. I considered chronograph to be the most important reloading tool I own. Probably next to a PBL Model 43 if I ever own one someday. Let me tell you why. I look at speed as a safety indicator! That's because velocity equates pressure. The higher the velocity the higher the pressure... there's no free lunch. Forget about looking for signs like flattening of primers, hard extractions or extractor marks on the head case. By the time you see these signs, you my friends were already living on borrowed time. Some might ask why not just follow what the reloading manuals recommend. Well, understand that those data were compiled in a controlled environment, with the best instrument money can buy, using their rifles/pressure barrels and components, which is totally different than yours. We handloaders don't have that luxury. Worst yet, we have to test our handloads ourselves. You're dealing with tens of thousand of pressure right in front of your face and a for a price of two boxes of premium ammo, you can own the only instrument that can at least tells you if your ammo is safe and you're going to deprive yourself of that?

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^^^ agree 100% with you on the pressure signs, most of it is like reading tea leaves and most of these pressure signs are entirely dependent upon the materials used in the case and the primer... about the only reliable pressure sign is stuck cases, sticky bolts, and blown cases, other than that you really don't know...aside from the chrony helping to sort out loads and help avoid over pressure, it is just plain fun to use!

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but for almost every hunter who has ever pulled the trigger, 200-300 fps even, will make little difference worth noting. One should learn to shoot first. Then learn to reload.
Amen.And I agree with most of what you said.Unfortunately, even less people out there that call themselves reloaders can identify pressure signs on a fired case although they think they can. A flattened primer can be caused by excessive headspace, a tough bolt lift by a little softer brass etc. lots of variables. As stated, a chronograph will help let you know what's going on. A flattened primer and tough bolt lift on a 22-250 shooting 3200 fps is usually not a pressure problem...but for a guy just shooting and evaluating his brass, he probably thinks he has a laser on his hands.

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If you shot a coyote from 30 yards and it ran off, you either missed, made a bad shot, or that was Gods personal pet.If you push a 40 grain lead free bullet out of the muzzle at 3600 or faster and keep the range bellow 300 yards it should work. Just don't hit bone. That bullet at 3600 is very doable in a 223 and depending on your gun you can go faster and still maintain accuracy. The powder you are using is way to slow for a 40 grain bullet. On paper you are barely getting 3100. You need a faster powder for such a light bullet. N133 is very good but its pricey. Benchmark is also very good and doesn't cost near as much. SPEED IS YOUR FRIEND!!

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Load it as fast as you can without any pressure signs and until accuracy is affected, and hunt with it. How fast is too fast... how can you tell!
By reading the reloading manuals and looking at their recommended velocity range. Like many say exceeding NNNN fps will be counter productive or cause bullet disintegration. Had an Uncle that tried to max out his 22-243AI with the bullets available them. Perfect pattern at 25yds. At 100 not a mark on target. backed down to 50 and got a smatter of grey dents. had to walk it back to about 30yards to get a bullet hole again. By that point the bullet was starting to disintegrate in flight. You can also go to slow to where the bullet won't open up and mushroom at all when it hits the game. Just look up velocity ranges in the manuals, and make sure you are in that. Bisley - and then shoot at various ranges to see how much it drops. The chrono helps you figure that out without having long range ranges available. But like you say, the animal isn't likely to be able to tell the difference of being hit with 2500 fps bullet and a 2800 fps bullet, as long as the bullet holds together and mushrooms.

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