mtn dog

Need suggestions on most reliable trucks or SUV

83 posts in this topic

Here is my primary use vehicle, and hunting vehicle. I just have the basic model, which is the V-8, 4.6L. It realistically gets about 10-12 on the city, and around 15- 18 on the highway. Its does great going up and down the Cleveland NF mountains. Good on steep hills too. I have driven it through steady water of about 12-18inches deep with no problems. Its a great SUV and there are plenty of accessories for them too. And, after washing it up, it looks really good to take the family around town too.post-3-1308147779.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a new off road mini? :):)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Frank: HA HA HA. Its a '03 Land Rover Discovery II

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Its a '03 Land Rover Discovery II
Had a very close friend that owned one. It was definitely a fine vehicle, but just wait until it needs something! Parts took forever to order, and were very, very expensive when found. It didn't nickel and dime hm to death, it twenty and fifty dollared him to death.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done some work on those in the past.. they are not friendly to maintain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any half ton ford chevy or dodge will be fine for what you describe. Forget the diesel it will not save you money overall with your application. If you were to tow weekly over 8,000lbs then you should think about it but otherwise stay gas and half ton. Beware that if you get a tent trailer, ask yourself if that will involve a bigger hardsided trailer in the future. If so the consider a 3/4 ton and the gas engines will still be fine.From what you described, I would buy a used F250 in the smaller gas engine. I have owned chevy and ford and my brother has owned dodge, all good but I think the 2000-10 decade Ford put out great trucks, with fewer problems. I have a 2004 ford f250 with the v10 4x4 with 75k miles with nothing more than one set of pads, oil and air filter changes and one tranny oil change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@ Frank: HA HA HA. Its a '03 Land Rover Discovery II
You had me worried for awhile.I thought you were going to say a "Mini Cooper"on steroids. :roflmao3[1]: Glad you cleared that up.OK one question from me.On the Jeep Cherokee,is it easy to work on,(hood up),and plenty of room ?My Honda Passport can be a bear to work on,without special tools and all.I mean,very little handroom.And some plenty of 4 letter words........Have an oil leak at the valve cover gasket.Been patching it,til I can have it repaired right.Instead of regular bolts,Isuzu (Rodeo) has Allen heads holding the valve cover down.Those Allen heads are a mistake. :fireworks3: If I had my choice,I'd replace them.But,this Honda has been a good one,like my ex-Ford E-200 Econoline van.It had a 3 speed.And I put close to 1 mill miles on it.Owned it for over 20 years. The tranny,to the rear end,has never been touched.My workhorse.Just for kicks,how 'bout a Hummer ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current rig is an 08 Chevy 1/2 ton crew 4x4 Vmax (6.0L). It's fun and fast (for a truck). But I'd not buy one again. My previous truck was a 99 4x4 2500. I'll go back to 2500 trucks. My main peeve is the little 5 1/2 ft bed. With a topper, that extra foot (2500s are 6 1/2 ft beds) is about 40 cu ft of volume. It's surprizing how much that extra foot means. On mileage, my 99 2500 6.0L got 12.5/14.5 mpg. The 1/2 ton 08 6.0L gets almost exactly the same. A 5.3L would get much better, I hear. Of course, if you jack it up 8-10" and put 37" tires on it, forget about mileage. For towing a little trailer under 5000 lbs, I wouldn't bother with a diesel. Friends I did horses with had them. Great for about 6000 lbs and up. Below that, not worth the money or putting up with the high cost of purchase, maintenance, and fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd recommend a 2nd gen Toyota 4Runner (1996-2003) 4x4 or a 1st or 2nd gen Toyota Tacoma Double Cab. Toyota's 4x4 systems are pretty much bomb proof from a reliability perspective and if they do break they are readily repairable at reasonable price levels. The aftermarket supports these trucks as if they were 350 Chevy small blocks - everyone has something for them. Reliability from a driving perspective is top notch. Duh, these vehicles are from the era when Toyota was the undisputed leader in quality and long term durability. That rep has taken a beating in the past 2 years but still they are top rated rigs.These rigs are generally decent on fuel consumption too. V6's average 19 mpg combined and I4's will consistently return a combined 23 mpg; hard to beat for trucks.I returned to the Toyota ranks after a 3 year affair with a used Chevy Silverado 4x4. That truck ultimately cost far more to operate as the 5.3 V8 was thirsty and once it hit 100K miles it gave me a $600 surprise repair bill every 8 weeks.Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Toyota 4-Runner is a good choice too. However, if you can find a deal on an old full sized Jeep Cherokee (late 70's or very early 80's) and put a few bucks into it, it will pull through just about anything. My old 1981 girl gets about 20-MPG with the 258-6 cyl and the Mopar fuel injection I installed. Off road, at slow speeds it is really stingy on fuel. It's simple, easy to work on and built like a tank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd recommend a 2nd gen Toyota 4Runner (1996-2003) 4x4 or a 1st or 2nd gen Toyota Tacoma Double Cab. Toyota's 4x4 systems are pretty much bomb proof from a reliability perspective and if they do break they are readily repairable at reasonable price levels. The aftermarket supports these trucks as if they were 350 Chevy small blocks - everyone has something for them. Reliability from a driving perspective is top notch. Duh, these vehicles are from the era when Toyota was the undisputed leader in quality and long term durability. That rep has taken a beating in the past 2 years but still they are top rated rigs.These rigs are generally decent on fuel consumption too. V6's average 19 mpg combined and I4's will consistently return a combined 23 mpg; hard to beat for trucks.I returned to the Toyota ranks after a 3 year affair with a used Chevy Silverado 4x4. That truck ultimately cost far more to operate as the 5.3 V8 was thirsty and once it hit 100K miles it gave me a $600 surprise repair bill every 8 weeks.Good luck.
This all depends on what you want to spend, dollar for dollar I will take my jeep, sure those toys are nice but the 258 and the 4.0L are both very good engines and a real 4x4 has a straight axle. I saw the TACO to just bought on that other post and it looks like a great rig but I would not take that where I take my jeep, not that it wouldn't make it but it's a lot of money there to be toying around with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Jawbreaker. More than once, I have had passengers that said, "We better stop here or we'll get stuck." I slow chruned the 258 because it develops a ton of torque at low RPMs, slipped her into low range 4WD and badda bing, she crawls through all kinds of stuff with no problem. Once while night hunting around Barstow we ended up a little lost and found ourselves in the Barstow flood plain (We found out later where we were). Almost hubs deep in soft sand. Hot Loads Kenny was totally convinced we were screwed, blued and tattooed. BUT....De Panzer pulled us out of there even though we had to plow through several hundred yards of really soft sand. It's not easy to turn in conditions like that. It's a good thing we were not in his 4WD Suburban or we would have been screwed, for sure. Kenny is now a believer in the abilities of Der Panzer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will keep my jeep GC does what I need pulls what I need to pull dont get the best milage out there but I didnt buy it for that I bought it to go places I couldnt take my ford .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree. I have a 2006 F150 SuperCrew 4x4, cuz I need it. I had 5 Toyota trucks over a 20 year period, and I was tired of riding in a wheelbarrow. I'm older now and wanna be comfortable. After driving all the different trucks, I decided on the Ford. I was raised a Chevy guy, but, gotta go with what's right for you. I needed 4x4 (live in the mtns.), don't haul alot, but heck, even a 1/2 ton will haul a decent size trailer, mine's rated at 9800lbs. The selling point for me was the comfort, and after adding the Magnaflow exhaust, K&N intake, and Edge Evolution programmer, I get 23-24 on the freeways in the valley. Up here, about 19. Not bad, considering small trucks are maybe getting 20mpg. My .02 Good luck with your decision.
I just traded my 03 Land Rover Discovery in for a 07 F-150 FX4. I feel so much happier in the Ford now. It is rommier, which is one thing I really lacked on my last vehicle. Gas mileage so far is much better as well. I have not had a chance to take it out yet, but from what I hear from everyone, it should perform well. I would for sure recommend you test drive a Ford F150, before you decide on buying anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My $0.02. My first hunting vehicle was a 1974 Toyota Landcruzer. After I bought it I was told the aluminum block would require a valve job at 50k miles. At 54,000 miles....I needed a valve job. I traded it in on a new 1983 Chevy Luv 4X4 pick up......the 1600cc engine just lacked any power. The next one was a 1962 international scout that I had a 287 installed in. BIG mistake!!!! I kept breaking the rear axle. It took me 2 years of searching before I found what I was looking for. I wanted a v-8, automatic transmission, full size anything but a pick up. I finally found a 10 year old 1985 Ford Bronco with 47,000 original miles on it. It looked brand new and everyone thought it was a '94 or '95!!!!I used that for 16 years and the turning radius is very tight!!! Over the years I replaced the transfer case, transmission (twice), engine (once), rear gears, front gears, the entire front drive line and the rear axle broke 3 times. (OK, I was very hard on that thing, my bad). The 3rd time the rear axle broke I got rid of it after putting over 200k miles on it. It was my only vehicle, so I sat down and made a decision. #1 I would buy a vehicle just for hunting....only. #2 I would get another vehicle for every day use. I bought another Bronco (1984) and a 2009 Mustang. I just got back from a hunting trip & it seems that every square inch of the Bronco has scratches on the paint. And the inside has about a 1/4" thick coat of dust. But I don't care!!!! It's my hunting rig and I probably won't use it again until my next hunt. While I was at camp, one of the other hunters was whining about the scratches on his P/U. I pointed at mine and said "See that, I don't care about the scratches...That's my hunting rig!" For a hunting rig I want a few things, power (v-8), roominess (yes I've slept in the back quite a few times), 4X4 & towing capacity. I don't care about the gas mileage as I don't drive the thing everyday. I want it to get me in and out, period. As a hunting rig its going to take abuse, that can't be avoided. For that reason I won't use my only vehicle for both every day use and hunting. I've done that and learned.....1 car for daily use & 1 for hunting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Alll the old solid front axle chevys from the 70s up to the independent suspension in the late 90s are good rigs for the most part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two ford pickups. One is a F-250 4x4 97 powerstroke 7.3 w/ Banks mods done, crewcab with 200K miles. This old truck has been a reliable workhorse but does not have the best ride. The other is a 2010 F-150 4x4 SuperCrewcab w/ gas motor. I have 33K miles on it and so far not one problem except a nail in a tire. The 6 speed tranny is so smooth that you don't know it is shifting. The nice feature on the new fords is the sinc system. It gives you a automatic link of putting your phone on the screen in the car. Phonebook/call history/incoming call identification is all right there on a screen that even I can read. MPG is about 16 on the hiway but it does have a tow rating over 10000#. I'd go test drive one of the new fords, my son-in-law bought the chevy 4x4 and he's sorry now he didn't get the ford after he's played with the sinc system in the Ford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok i will probably get banned because of how much hate im gonna generate with this comment but here we go.I have buddy who doesnt hunt but does like to wheel and hike while taking shots with a camera instead of a rifle. He runs a chevy avalanch and couldnt be more happy with it. they have your back seat with tons of room and the rear seats fold down into the floor board if you need cargo space. If you need more bed then the back window and wall also fold down allowing you to exstend the bed up to the back of the front seats. They make awesome wheelers if you armor/plate them in the right spots. the newer ones tend to look better because they dont have so much plastic on the out side but the older ones are easier to hide offroad scars. These guys might not be the most common of trucks to upgrade but those who have love them. I have built some skids plates for my buddies and i will see if i can find some pics of it but it really is a great truck. Not to mention is got great towing ability. 4537286808.jpgSkyjackerAvalancheC7661SK.jpg122322843.jpg08_avalanche_ltz_cargo-ucc.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats one sick looking Avalanche, i wouldn't mind rolling around the mountains in one of them, yup yup!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An Avalanche would be good for the reasons mentioned *IF* one ripped out the sorry independent front suspension in favor of a solid axle. Especially if you're gonna run bigger tires. That top one makes me laugh...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if all your doing is riding trails and a little bit of wheeling in tough spots there is nothing wrong with an ifs i used to have an 85 yota with ifs and its wheeled pretty good ya the front didnt flex like i wanted it to but i built the rear end to do most of the flexing for me and it would still get me there. But i do agree if you wanted to do stuff like what i do in my jeep then yes your gonna need a solid front axle but in this case this person is just looking for some thing mild not extream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bisley, I was talking to my truck mechanic about buyindieselisel.responseponce was exactly the same as yours, and the same order. He told me if I buy adieseldeisel, to take it to a different mechanic.Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now