mtn dog

shooting sticks question

27 posts in this topic

Any shooting sticks I've ever seen or tried seem to share a common problem if my target doesn't show up where I'm expecting it to be. Sticks and tripods are great for stalk-and-shoot hunting but frustrating on a stand. When I set up a stand, whether I'm sitting on the dirt, or using a folding stool, there is no easy way to pivot if my target suddenly appears outside the angle that the sticks comfortably allow. In other words, I'll guess where I think/hope a coyote will present himself, then set the sticks and seat accordingly, but if my target is outside the comfortable angle that the sticks let me cover, I have to either lean and twist to an unsteady position or quickly and quietly lift and reposition the sticks and rifle to make the shot. I don't want to make all that movement when a coyote is right out there in view. And if I'm on uneven, sloping terrain, the legs of the bipod sticks might not fit the slope or cause me to take my eyes off the target to get the sticks in a new position. Bad news.I found these videos for bipod shooting sticks that can be used in the normal way OR used like a mono-pod with the foot supported by a 'pouch' at the shooter's crotch. The video makes it look like the shooter can easily pivot while maintaining support of his rifle. No need to lift and replant the bipod sticks as you turn to face the target coming in at the periphery of your view.

http://www.bipodshootingsticks.com/TV.mpgMy question is whether anybody has actually seen or used this particular type of shooting sticks? How well do they work in real field conditions, especially on a hillside? Second question is whether this configuration sends the recoil down in the "family jewels"?! Ouch.

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I tried them at a gun show. They were not stabile enough standing up with your body as the support for elevation. The guy is real slick demoing them but he doesn't hold the gun in position long enough to detect that it bobs up and down. My regular bipod sticks swivel side to side.

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Thanks for that input. The video seemed to be too slick and fast for a good demo and I wondered what it was not showing. There are several good sticks that swivel or pivot but it seems like, without moving the sticks, the shooter needs to shift himself around the sticks as he pivots left or right. OR must move the sticks.

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I shoot right handed and when that situation arises, I grab the stcks at the crossing point and lift it up rifle and all. You can then shift it a foot or so to either side to get a shot. My Stix are the Varmint Al type.

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Me, too, and mine are a modified version of the Varmint Al sticks. "A+" for simple and practical and cheap! When the ground is even and there isn't a lot of brush at my feet, moving them is not a real problem other than being an extra action that might make a coyote look my way. However, I spend very little time on flat terrain (that's why the "Mountain Dog" alias) and it seems like there is usually stubborn brush and rocks and loose sand in front of me that have to be accommodated when I replant the poles. It's not as though this ever ruins my day. I'm just working on my bucket list of little nuisances that might be fixable or might help others on this forum.

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I agree MtnDog.. In fact I had discussed using them rather than my Bipods when hunting with DaBob. First stand, I took them and didnt use them. My mistake. With the coyotes up above us I could have gotton into a better position by leaving the sticks "had I been using them" in front of me, and rolling to the side and shooting with one elbow for support. The bipods caused much more movement and discomfort for a better shot. Im rethinking the Bipods, and maybe just going back to the sticks.

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? Are you shooting at coyote size critters at 100 yards or less? Or are you taking 150+ yard shots? Good ol sitting position has worked for a long long time. Why is it that everybody thinks they need a shooting stick for called in coyotes? Just more commercial poop to buy and haul around...Walt

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sit sideways to the area that you want to cover.have your off shoulder pointed at the one extreme,face the other and Wala! you can swing to cover the WHOLE thing.

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All of my years of hunting large game or predators I have never used any of the above and was very successful

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? Are you shooting at coyote size critters at 100 yards or less? Or are you taking 150+ yard shots? Good ol sitting position has worked for a long long time. Why is it that everybody thinks they need a shooting stick for called in coyotes? Just more commercial poop to buy and haul around...Walt
Yup...I agree.But, I usually carry sticks with me. Certain times they come in handy. Mine are el cheapos made from two home depot dowels and tied together with a boot lace, about a 5 dollar investment. I actually like these type the best. For uneven ground you can pull up one side, if you need them longer slide the lace up etc. When they are convienent to use and get setup on without a lot of movement I'll use them. But the majority of times I still shoot stuff like Walt said, seated with elbows on knees. I've watched guys scare off real easy shots trying to get their sticks repositioned...people rely way too much on them.

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I agree with Walt too. You should be able to lock up nice and steady in a proper sitting position.

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Hard to argue with the great opinions that have been posted. Thanks, gentlemen. :lol: I was curious about the sticks in the videos for their simplicity, however, becoming more proficient WITHOUT any sticks is the best solution.

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Practice practice practice, would not even think of coyote hunting with out shooting sticks, not to mention big game. I feel i work way to hard to blow a shot.. :wacko:

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New version of sticks to help out with the problem of the target not being where you want it. The vertical stick has a long enough spike in it to hold the unit up by itself and to adjust the horizontal level. It has it's cons, but it's my first attempt and seems to work well enough. It still folds up nicely and is easy to carry.post-3-1296060708.jpgpost-3-1296060713.jpgpost-3-1296060757.jpg

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Nice effort, PBM. How about taping a video showing how you use these and move to line up a target? Even better if you can show them in a real hunting scene. From your photos alone, I can't visualize how these are different, better or worse than the two-legged sticks we all love to curse.

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The added horizontal bar gives you about 2 more feet of a shooting rest. If a yote shows up a little to the right of where it's expected, just raise your rifle up and set it back down on the horizontal bar where needed.

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would not even think of coyote hunting with out shooting sticks, not to mention big game. I feel i work way to hard to blow a shot.
Exactly... I totally agreeWhile there is no perfect way of doing this, I personally have seen wayyyy more misses without stix than with them. Including very close distances. Not just long shots. I've seen blown shots with the stix, but not near as many without. With that said, there ARE some really good off hand, sitting shooters out there. But I, and from what I've seen, LOTS of folks are not. Try this. Take your shooting stix to the range and shoot a couple of 5 shot groups at 100 yards. Now do it in the sitting (or standing) position without bi-pods or shooting stix. Prone position not included btw! This may help in one's decision as to how much a shooting rest is needed. Maybe? lolFrank

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I am with you 100% Frank (and most everyone else). The other day we were shooting ground squirrels during a lunch break and none of us had sticks. One of the guys had a tent in the truck and we fabricated makeshift sticks out of them which immediately reformed the non-stick users in the group. The missed shots were reduced significantly!! I have used the sitting position for years but after trying sticks I was set in my ways!BTW: the tent poles were great as the elastic in them made it really easy to swing the rifle from side to side but also provided adequate support. I will most certainly utilize the tent poles in a pinch in the future.Happy Hunting,Bear

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I've been considering the Bog Gear bi-pod or the Stoney point rapid pivot bipod. Hopefully these will help with all my misses. :archer-green:

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I use a Primos trigger stick. It is a mono stick with a strap for the gun and I just pick up the whole thing and adjust with the trigger. I like it .----------kevin---------

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I made a set of shooting sticks yesterday....took less that 5 minutes and cost $4.51.............check out the vid above, I may add some surgical tubing to them at the top so you could pick up the sticks like in the first post (video) of this thread.DAVEF

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Now you're talking! Nice sticks.As I mentioned earlier in this thread, those are exactly like the ones I make except mine are wooden dowels and I dont use the castration bands...just the dowels and a boot lace. Yep...about 5 bucks, cheap and effective. They usually last damn near forever or until I forget them somewhere. They also work good as a tail stripper. Obviously shooting off sticks is much steadier than shooting with elbows off knees...which in turn is steadier than offhand. Then again, shooting off sandbags is steadier than all. You'll definitely shoot better groups with any kind of rest... but for coyote hunting, where alot of the shots are 50-75 yards, do you really need a super steady rest? If so, definitely use some sticks.

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I fashioned some improvised sticks from one of my tent poles crossed over itself. I was amazed how well it worked! The elastic cords inside really help reduce the weight on the support hand and create a dynamic shooting position. It feels like the rifle is floating. My tent was on its last legs so I decided to do something else with the poles :)Sorry no photos yet but I made this handi diagram:

post-5893-1296151111.gif

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