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Effective Calling

38 posts in this topic

I agree with Rich, but for new guys who have never called in a coyote at all it's probably a skill left to more experienced callers.

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I agree with Rich, but for new guys who have never called in a coyote at all it's probably a skill left to more experienced callers.
Well said John. A caller needs to gain some confidence with the old tried and true prey distress screams first.

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Right on, without confidence you may never see one except by mistake :rolleyes:

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You guys are right on I can remember going out and thinking this is not going to work and they were probably coming in but i was not realy trying to see them. You need fath in yourself and your calls , and all your equipment.

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Howling is a tricky business. All of the above info is good so think of it this way. You've heard the old adage, "The less said, the better"...well, howling has to be done correctly because it is truly a language with specific inflections. If you just let out howls, you may as well be speaking German while attempting to sweet talk a French girl. Even worse, you may be inadvertently challenging a dog that is not an Alpha and he or she may not be up for a confrontation. If you are not 100% sure of the appropriate timing, inflection, and language, forget the howling. You may be doing more harm than good.Predators have incredible hearing. Your distress call can be heard for great distances. After I hunker down, I usually wet the back of one hand and do a series of lip squeaks off my hand. I do that every 30-seconds for about 5-minutes. I have called in more than a few, just lip squeaking. Next, I go to a predator call and call in soft moaning tones...simulating near death suffering. Then I wait for a few minutes and keep my eyes peeled. After about 5 or seven minutes, I get on the distress call with medium volume for about 30-seconds and stop. If they are nearby, they will come.I think many guys call in animals they never see. Then they start calling loudly and either scare the predator away or give themselves away to the predator. Also, stay as still as possible while calling. Use a calling technique that does not involve a lot of hand or arm motion. Remember the military basics of tactical movement....vertical movement is more difficult to spot than lateral movement. :fireworks3: and worth every penny :good:

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For what it's worth, I've heard a few rabbits and their screaming after being shot. I sure wouldn't call it soft or moderate. I disagree that you can scare a coyote away by calling too loud.

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I use an FX5 because I move too much with hand calls and have zero confidence in my calling now. Been a brutal year. Starting to think yotes are extinct. I'm not hunting yotes right now so perhaps someone can educate me with howling sounds. Perhaps link to locator, challenge, etc digi calls so I can start distinguishing em?

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I use an FX5 because I move too much with hand calls and have zero confidence in my calling now. Been a brutal year. Starting to think yotes are extinct. I'm not hunting yotes right now so perhaps someone can educate me with howling sounds. Perhaps link to locator, challenge, etc digi calls so I can start distinguishing em?
--------------------------------------------------------------Most of the labels you see concerning coyote language are not actually correct. No human knows what each and every coyote yip or howl actually means. Most of the time, it is wise to use non aggressive sounding howls so as not to spook the younger coyotes. It is important to keep it natural, which means no more than one or three lonesome sounding howls to begin a stand, and then go silent for several minutes. It is also important to realize that coyotes often come to your howls in silence. Lack of a vocal response is not an indication that the coyote isn't coming in. If no customers after several minutes, you can howl again. After second period of silence, I like to go to puppy squeals.The file manager is not allowing me to upload sound for some reason, so I will try again later.BC,If you E mail me at cronkcalls@cox.net I will send you some sounds to use when howling up coyotes.

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For what it's worth, I've heard a few rabbits and their screaming after being shot. I sure wouldn't call it soft or moderate. I disagree that you can scare a coyote away by calling too loud.
+1. Although I haven't hunted coyotes yet, I've heard several rabbits scream after being shot. Some screamed for a short period, maybe 3-5 seconds before they passed on. But a few have screamed for a good 15 seconds or more and they were surprisingly loud. You could easily hear the cries from 100 yards away and probably more. It was kind of disturbing actually, and I didn't like hearing it. But one thing's for sure: it wasn't subtle.

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For what it's worth, I've heard a few rabbits and their screaming after being shot. I sure wouldn't call it soft or moderate. I disagree that you can scare a coyote away by calling too loud.
I'll bet the bunnies scream really loud if you put their nuts in a vice too :fireworks3: , however I don't see how rabbits screaming after being shot and the associated amplitude, is relevant to any statement I made previously. In my personal opinion, to attract predators, it's not necessary to specifically sound like any particular animal (although it would seem beneficial if the call mimicked a local food source). As you know, predators come to the call for a variety of reasons. Hunger, instinct, curiosity, territorial, etc., and although there are general, seasonal guidelines for some responses, most of the time it's a roll of the dice. Since, predators usually don't tell us why our stand was not successful, we can only guess and make conclusions based upon positive and negative experiences. Personally, I like to low-key call at first because in general, I have experienced a more positive response. So, based upon my own experience, I will continue to do so.Another personal opinion is that I believe you can scare a predator away with volume that is too loud. I think 90db+ screams from a call box will make the average coyote think twice before confronting a 300-pound bunny. But, that is simply my opinion. And you know the old sayings about opinions. These forums are valuable because we all have opinions based upon our experiences. I'll bet fishermen have the same debates and discussions relating to their pursuit. There is no silver bullet and no wrong method. If you call and an animal shows up, you must have done something right. However, if you do the same thing again and nothing shows up....it doesn't mean you did something wrong. Come to think of it, it's a lot like being married. I've been married for 17-years and I can't figure out the responses of that female animal either. :good:

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Red, you need to try a different toy! :welcomeani:

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