mtn dog

Any flintknappers here?

9 posts in this topic

I'm getting ready to teach myself flintknapping and later some of the other primitive crafts.There's no end to the how-to videos on YouTube but it would be great to find other knappers to learn from or with. :signs1180lq: Ken

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milk-a-what?
:( I'm guessing you're asking what is flintknapping? It's making arrowheads, knives and other stone tools the primitive way from rocks like the Indians did.Like this:
Or even from beer bottle glass!...

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When I was stuck in Ohio last year I bought a video to try to learn it. It would be cool to make some obsidian arrow heads and use them on a deer hunt. I just never got around to collecting the antler tips and stuff to do it. One day the urge will be enough to start practicing - right now my time is being occupied with shooting silhouette matches and working up the perfect loads for it.

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When I was stuck in Ohio last year I bought a video to try to learn it. It would be cool to make some obsidian arrow heads and use them on a deer hunt. I just never got around to collecting the antler tips and stuff to do it. One day the urge will be enough to start practicing - right now my time is being occupied with shooting silhouette matches and working up the perfect loads for it.
Man, I sure understand that! My bucket list of "Things I Want To Learn" is much longer than the time I probably have left on this earth - and I'm not THAT old. I've gathered loads of obsidian from some of my hunting & fishing spots, collected antlers, made some billets, boppers & flakers, but I'm still trying to figure out how to gather, collect or make the spare time to use any of it.There are some guys who knap their own arrow points, haft them on arrow shafts they cut, straightened and fletched, fired them from hand-hewn bows strung with sinew they chewed, and field-dressed their killed deer with stone knives they fashioned on the spot. That has to be gratifying. Beats the heck out of tying my own trout flies. :(

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Growing up in South Dakota, on the Missouri River, means lots of arrowheads and other artifacts to be picked up. ( now illegal) I don't have that many, but my brother has hundreds. Most of them are small, 3/4" or less, bird points. Alot of them have their tips broken off, and he has become pretty good at putting points on them again. I don't know if he's made any from scratch, but would think he has. I'll ask next time I talk to him, he still lives there. He is the only flintknapper I know.

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My guess is if you were to frequent some of the muzzleloader forums you will find some flintnappers there. Some of those reenactors go all out so there is sure to be some good knowledge there.

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I've seen people do flintnapping. I also had a friend who was into it and he learned by practicing with glass. That way he didn't waste his obsidian.Tools and everything you need to do flintnapping.http://www.flintknappingtools.com/Learning to make glass arrow heads. This looks pretty easy.

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I've actually just started getting into it. To start with all you really need is a pressure flaker and some glass bottle bottoms. Tons of lessons on it on YouTube.

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