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How do I determine "Length of Pull"

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I was told that my shotgun stock might be a bit long for me. What is Length of Pull....and how do I determine that, and what does it have to do with the length of the stock? Its a remington 12 ga 1100 :smiley-funny-post-sign:

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end of but plate to trigger = lop, 1100 are like 14.5 inches, you my need to cut stock and reinstall recoil pad to shorten. It's easyer to make them longer, have fun stephen :glare:

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You may be able to put a different recoil pad on it to shorten the LOP. Some of the new pads are thinner and actually reduce the recoil more. Cutting the stock is the last resort. How much too long is it?

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Are you having problems getting the stock up on your shoulder when you raise it up?What is the length from the trigger to the end of the recoil pad?Are you under 5' 6" tall or shorter with short arms?Remington shotgun stocks have always been a little on the short side for shooters that are about 5' 9" and taller.If you don't have any trouble raising your shotgun up and putting it on your shoulder while wearing a coat I wouldn't shorten the stock.

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Im five foot 9. I havent measure the gun for me yet. Thats what I didnt know how to do.I had no idea it was too long. I had an NRA instructor give me some lessons over the weekend. He mentioned it was a bit too long for me, but not to worry about it. When I fixed the human error problems he pointed out, my shooting was fine. Should I even worry about it?

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If you can shoulder it without any problems, don't worry about it.

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tip of index finger to crook of elbow.
----------------------------------That would be fine if you shoot your shotgun with butt firmly in your elbow joint, but I have never seen anyone who did that. If you can shoulder the shotgun when dressed in winter clothing, and shotgun does not pattern high or low, then you should be fine. Usually, shortening the stock will cause the gun to shoot higher.Remington shotguns being 14" L.O.P. have always been aboutright for me, but Browning's 14&1/2" is too long. I like a shorter length of pull for calling, because proper fit makes for smoother shouldering of the gun and makes it easier to swing to my far right easier.

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Rich is right. Get a big piece of card board take the gun out and throw it up and shoot it do not take your time and aim. Shoot at small target from about 20 yards several times just throwing it up there to see where it hits. I like my duck guns shorter than what they should be. Makes a difference for wader strap and big coat.

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tip of index finger to crook of elbow.
Not really Mookie You need to measure with your finger on the trigger(not to the tip) then lay the stock on forearm and the butt should be in crook of your elbow touching your bicep. This will vary a little with different body types too. Best way is a visit to a shotgun stock fitter, they normally have sample stocks with different LOP's, different casts (in or out) plus different comb drops. Having a shotgun that fits you makes a world of difference.

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I got my information from an article about British stock fitting. They did not say it was an exact measurement but a way to get close and then to take the rest of the fitting from there. Get it close and work your way in, similar to how I build my rifle stocks.If you google LOP you get hundreds of different answers and they all seem to come out the same unless using some off the wall method involving cats and hobbits. It seems that there is no exact specific industry standard but a good stock fitter will do exactly what you want.

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I don't know what google says, all I'm going by is almost 50 years of shot gun experience and tens of thousands of rounds consumed. My ears will confirm this. It actually is pretty dam close if you put your index finger on the trigger and lay the stock on your forearm to the bicep. I've been fitted by several gunstock fitters and they all have different ways. The best I've found here locally is a guy at Commanche that is a Brit and used to work for Purdy in England. LOP is subjective also to the shooter and the type of shooting. A duck gun can be a little short for warm clothes, an upland gun I like a little short also, clays guns due to the volume shooting need to be a good fit. The two matched guns I take to Argentina are fitted perfectly and allow me to shoot over 4-8 flats of ammo a day without any problems to cheek or shoulder. Some of the guys rent the guns down there aand get the crap beat out of them. One way I like to check a gun is to close my eyes and mount the gun to my shoulder then open up and see where I'm at. For cast and comb IMO you need professional help. Riflestocks are a whole different operation.

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I will be honest. I got my information from a magazine. I figure the information from that mag would be a bit more accurate than your typical IKNOWEVERYTHINGABOUTGUNSANDYOUDONT.COM forum.I know very little about fitting shotgun stocks, I have custom fitted a few of my own rifle stocks for different purposes, but I am starting to get into shotguns a bit more. The article did give some very good reasons why a quality English shotgun costs so much more than a good American.

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