Jump to content
BC9696

HEATING A TENT

Recommended Posts

Remember, it isn't just the bag, you MUST have good insulation under you. My recommendation is the thermarest. Best sleeping pad available, period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, they are only about 1" thick, that that is all you need. The one I used for years was only 48" long by 24" wide. I never got cold on it and it was very comfortable. By the way, they are self inflating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this is kinda funny...I have one exactly that size. Forgot I bought it...had gotten lucky and decided to spend some winnings at the Las Vegas Bass pro Shop. I did read that they make some 2" thick ones though...I wouldn't mind a little more padding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Give it try Bruce, you really don't need more padding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After traveling 300K+ miles touring the country on motorcycles and a half dozen really good spills...that thin little mat just isn't gonna cut it. Not with my fussy back. Just another reason I had to lose all the weight. I no longer have anywhere near the back pain I used to when i was much heavier but a good night's rest is still vital. I found a sweet deal on a NIB Bedrug for my truck on craigslist today...under $200. so that should help provide additional padding/insulation and make my truck tent a little nicer and warmer inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you need more insulation you can always put an anti-fatigue mat under the bed rug. Lot's of options there. Can be a little pricey. Personally I'll stick with my moving blankets and be warm and comfy. Karl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Mr. Heater buddy heater that is indoor and tent safe. It works great. However all my Coleman tents have allot of ventilation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BC9696 Have you given the thought of renting a regular tent to try that? As then you can use a heater safely as long as you vent it so you have fresh air coming in and venting out the moisture and CM so you all will wake up and yes you have to have it a safe distance from anything flammable and not have tip over when on (best to turn it off when sleeping)I'm typing this after using Coleman Catalytic heaters for years in tents but I was also lucky enough to work for a company The Grant Boys (1980s) and learn the dos and don’ts (Never use a lantern to heat a space as the un burnt fuel fumes it produces etc) And always must have fresh air coming in low and at the top or highest point for escaping co2 and other fumes (Braz’s Chili :pot: ) you can open in the tent to ventilate I was even trained to repair the Coleman products @ Grant Boys now they don't liability is to greatYour rig looks nice but I would not want to feel that rig move 3 times in a night from people having a nature call :blink: and I'm pretty sure you don’t have enough room in there with you and your kids to have a Porto potty (still need to vent the tent :roflmao3[1]: )And for regular hunting and camping if you want to drive to some place to hunt you have to shut down and pack up everything up :1087: But thats my :signs1180lq: mtn dog Good points on the fumes could you supply more info on the problems of using Coleman Catalytic heater's from what you know ThanksStan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes me about 15-20 minutes to erect, 5-7 minutes to tear down which isn't too bad IMO. I have issues w/ snakes...was bit as a teen and it left a scar on my leg and a bigger mental scar in my head. I will admit I have purchased many things for "hunting" that I now pay to store. I guess that's part of the learning curve for newbies. Gotta GPS w/ a huge manual I have yet to read, 3 bipods and one monopod, packs and stuff I may never use. This tent won't be one of those things I don't use...of this I am sure. My girls like it too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Coleman BlackCat catalytic heater in my 10'x10' Kodiak, but I only turn it on for a few minutes before bed, and then long enough to warm the tent in the morning. It's designed for indoor use but I don't trust it enough to sleep with it on. I also sleep in a Cabelas Pine Ridge Classic sleeping bag that is rated to -20*, plus a roll of 2" memory foam that I lay between my bag & cot, and an old comforter if I need extra layering. If your face gets cold, you can always throw a jacket or blanket over your head. Another option is getting a few of those 12-hour-long body/sleeping bag warmers and stick them in your sleeping bag *see link*. Been tent camping in temperatures near 0* with no problems. I also keep a heavy wool blanket inside of every vehicle I own (including my work truck). You never know when you're going to be stranded in cold weather for an extended period of time.http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/template...h-box.jsp.form1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:):):wacko::)
:) Who's beating a dead horse? I didn't see anyone else mention the jacket/blanket over your head idea, the body/sleeping bag warmer idea, or the suggestion of keeping a wool blanket with you at all times. Sure beats "pulling your truck up next to your campfire" (unless you actually prefer ash, smoke, and possibly sparks getting on your vehicle & tent)... :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep! I considered everyone's input and decided to play it safe. A Bedrug was installed yesterday...very nice! Like laying on a carpet. Covers the entire bed. I will lay a 50" X 90" 3" closed cell foam pad on top of it and the tent will work just fine. Already have sleeping bags, lights, those warmers and extra blankets. The basket I got for the towhitch will work as a step to make it easier to step uo into the tent (truck's gotta decent lift kit on it) so all I gotta do now is figure out whether to two tow the Jeep behind it or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't try and tow that Grand Cherokee! It is full time 4x4 and has to be towed off the ground. Not towable!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are two ways to tow one...on a trailer w/ all four tires off the ground or with the front tires off the ground and something that needs to be disconnected before towing. Been a long time since I owned a Gr. Cherokee and don't recall what we had disconnected. Anybody know? Think it was something to do with the tranny. Took a few minutes to reconnect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you already know. I just wanted to be sure. Some folks may think that it's a jeep, and so it can be towed. After they burn it up they start checking. Better to know up front.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are two ways to tow one...on a trailer w/ all four tires off the ground or with the front tires off the ground and something that needs to be disconnected before towing. Been a long time since I owned a Gr. Cherokee and don't recall what we had disconnected. Anybody know? Think it was something to do with the tranny. Took a few minutes to reconnect.
You're probably thinking of a REMCO driveshaft coupler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't try and tow that Grand Cherokee! It is full time 4x4 and has to be towed off the ground. Not towable!
Braz You are not correct. I pull a 2000 G. Cherokee behind my MH and have many years + many miles. Takes a few minutes manipulate the tranny and transfer case per the owners manual and to hook up with a Toad hookup hitch. I've also added a separate lighting system so I didn't have to go through the computer. If you search for Toads under Motorhomes you'll see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just making the comment based on how I remembered the owners manual in the 97 GC that I sold to Bruce. If I'm wrong, then I guess he can tow it. But that is sure not how I remembered the owners manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buzz they have changed that with your later model GC. Jeeps especially the Grand Cherokee's were always the worst vehicle to tow with tow trucks as they did not ever have a "true" neutral in the transfer case assembly. That has been changed now. So the older ones need a dolly and to have the rear driveline removed. Newer model Grand Cherokee's you can tow with all four wheels on the ground after you put the transfer case in neutral, then with the engine shut off, put the transmission in Park. The key should be in the unlocked OFF position.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×