StoneTower

Members
  • Content count

    503
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About StoneTower

  • Rank
    Shooter

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fair Oaks (Sacramento)
  • Interests
    Pulling the trigger and setting the hook!!!

Recent Profile Visitors

966 profile views
  1. My neighbor's family owns a cabin up the road only about 1/8 of a mile from that campground on the right hand side. We were suppose to use the cabin for deer hunting 2 years ago. I told him to be sure that none of his other family members were going to use the cabin the same weekend and he told me he knew for sure it was available. On Friday at 4pm he calls me and tells me that two of his aunts were "redecorating" the cabin that weekend. I ended up driving up a 2am, hunting all day and then driving back home late that night. That was the year I almost got run over by a scared bear...
  2. Is it a Sheridan? I have 2 of those. I also have a Beeman R1 in 20 caliber that is still in the original box and has never been fired. I think with the more powerful PCP air guns we have now, 20 is not as useful as it used to be. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=20+caliber+pellets&sprefix=.20+caliber%2Caps%2C209&crid=WIEW2TY2M39G
  3. Not taking pictures makes the posting of said pictures very difficult....
  4. I am in need of a new headlamp. I have Pelican 2630 that I like is dying a slow death and a Black Diamond Gemini that is about dead also. Many hours of use on both over the years. I am thinking of a Black Diamond Icon Headlamp. Any opinions on it or if there is something better? I like lights that use AA batteries. It is hard to recharge a battery when you are not close to an outlet and it sucks when the charge dies and you still have work to do even if you are at home. Both my main lights (listed above) use 3 AA batteries but the Black Diamond Icon uses 4 AA batteries. I have a nice Petzl that has 4 LEDs and runs off 2 AAA batteries, but the more powerful lights are my first choice. I also have 3 cheaper Energizer headlamps and a few Harbor Freight headlamps that are what I would consider a little above junk. Thanks, David
  5. I dumped about 10 old jars of salmon into my compost bin last year that I had because I was afraid of it. You might get by with eating 9 jars and then the 10th might be the one that kills you. Canned meat and tomatoes are nothing to mess around with. A can or jar of fish is not worth the risk as far as I see it. I am glad it worked out for you but I like to pick my battles and some things are not worth it. That is a funny story about the muskrats John...well 40 years after it happened it is funny...probably not so funny at the time.
  6. What did you pay for the barrel if you don't mind me asking. The last I heard you could buy the gun in another caliber and legally convert it to 50 Auto Eagle by purchasing and 50AE barrel. 50AE shares the same bolt as the 44 mag. 50AE is a rebated case. FYI....there are different generations of the Desert Eagle and not all generations can be converted to 50AE. Unless you need the extra power for something, the 44 mag has so many more bullet choices.
  7. Some people call them LDC (Lead Dust Collectors) when they are used with airguns so that they do not have to use the evil word "silencer". One has to be careful when a they say "if they can take it off of the airgun and fit it to a firearm". A hacksaw can remove just about any metal or plastic accessory and then you would be doing time in the BIG HOUSE with Bubba. It pays to error in the side of caution when you live in an anti-gun state like California.
  8. Good catch John. I need to wear my glasses. Those "8" look like "0" on my tablet. I remembered it wrong and when I looked it up I did not look carefully enough.
  9. I think you meant to say that the sturgeon was ecactly 60 inches long. You must have hit the 3 instead of the 0. Careful with the pictures. I believe the letter of the law is that you are not to take a sturgeon out of the water if it is not of legal size. They say it is to be sure the fish is not injured. DFW can always think of new laws to make fishing and hunting less fun. http://cdfgnews.wordpress.com/2012/12/31/new-sturgeon-regulations-effective-jan-1-2013/
  10. If you are shooting coyotes with the TSS it would not be such a bad deal. A good trip would cost you 2 to 4 shells. With duck and goose hunting you could burn through 10 to 25+ which would get rather expensive.
  11. I wonder if that plastic has tungsten in it? That is what some of the tungsten pellets are made of...plastic and tungsten. If you shot pure tungsten it would probably cut through the wad and score the barrel. It would also be difficult to cast into nice round shot. Yes, wads do make a difference. Check out the flightstopper wads used in black cloud. The wad holds the pellets together until the flaps extend and cause the wad to slip off the shot column. You can also control how the shot column is held together but changing the number and depth of slits when you start with unslit wads. Many people did not believe in shooting lead shot over a certain speed because it deforms on setback because it is much softer than steel and some other types of shot. If the lead deforms too much, it does not reach the target all the same time. When you shoot a pattern, it is a 2D representation of a 3D event. If only half the pattern reaches the target because the shot string is very long when the bird is a at that position in space, you might miss the bird. Many Europeans believe in "square" loads which are an equal height of shot in the wad perportional to the diamater of the wad, They say that those loads pattern better and have less shot string. If you load too much shot in a tube (wad) at some point is unable to move freely the choke without being sparyed out the end of the barrel. There is no such thing as the best load. Some loads pattern very well in some shotguns but do not do well in other guns. One of the old timers on one of the shotgun forums has talked about one of his neighbors who sawed the choke off of his shotgun after damaging the end of the barrel. He says this guy kills just as many birds as everyone else while using his beater shotgun.
  12. There was a guy on that shotgun forum a few years back that was killing swans with a .410 and TSS shot. It is the best money can buy without a doubt. As I as I have said, I often wonder why some birds do not fall. The load I found really reduces those times but I am sure there are times when a better shell would make the difference. One thing some people do not think about is an ounce of #4 steel has more pellets than an ounce of lead #4s. TSS will have even less for the same size shot. I think part why TSS works so well is the fact that you can shoot the heavier shot at slower speeds and still do more damage. It is difficult to get really fast stuff to pattern as well as a slower load.
  13. If you reload and have a 3-1/2 inch gun I can point you in the direction of a great load. If you have a 3" gun you might want to try the Kent 3" 1-1/4 load of #1s. There are guys on that forum that really like that load. I have not personally tried that Kent load but the guy that told me about it shared some of his load data with me and he knows what he is talking about. He has a 3-1/2" gun but shoots the smaller stuff because it patterns better and he gets better results. I am sure that TSS is wonderful stuff. I have often wondered how many of the birds that I missed were really hit. When I switched to that 1-1/4 oz of #4s my shell to bird ratio went way down. There are about 240 #4 pellets in 1-1/4 oz of pellets. It is really funny how the smaller pellets seem to punch right through the birds but my cousin's factory #3s end up in the meat. If I had the money, I would try the TSS (on the other hand I still might be too tight ). One of the things I like about duck and goose hunting is that I actually get to fire the gun when I go out more than once. If I was shooting shot that cost me $5.00 each time I pulled the trigger, I don't think I would have nearly as much fun. This was opening day 2012. The day started out slow so I wacked a spoony to make sure I still knew how to shoot and then a couple of teal, two small pintail and the geese were inbetween in there. That was with 25 shells on a public refuge that we walked into after the morning shoot (around 1:30pm). The soony was shot at about 35 yards and I am glad I did not hit her square in the body because there would not have been anthing left. My cousin was on the side of the pond and he said from his angle, he could see duck guts flying out as the bird was hit. This was another day on January 2014 where I only fired 9 shells. A good load of steel that is properly choked and matched to your particular gun will kill just fine as long as you do your part.
  14. There is lots of information about TSS on one of the shotgun reloading forums. I was told #8 or #9 is plenty for ducks out to 65-70 yards if you can lead them properly. Another problem with TSS in the smaller sizes it is difficult to find in the meat and it will break your teeth. I kill more ducks than most public land hunters each year and I do it with steel. I shoot a reload of 1-1/4 of #4 s at 1665 and if I do my part, they almost always hit the water dead. If I had the money to burn, I would be interested in TSS but the object of duck hunting is to call the ducks into a reasonable range before you shoot at them. If I had the money to burn, I would be hunting a really nice private club that served a night hot breakfast before shoot time too. I think one of the most important thing in bringing a duck or goose down quickly and cleanly is to make sure you have a dense enough pattern that you get 3 or 4 solid hits so that you increase your chances of hitting something vital.
  15. Air Rifle Hunter...a guy I know who lives in El Dorado CA (not El Dorado hills) who switched last year to above ground gardening. He has been collecting water well pressure tanks and cutting them open and using them for gardening containers. The tanks are usually made of steel and some are fiberglass. They have a rubber bladder in them and when the bladder starts to leak they are not repairable. On the steel tanks he welds legs on them and it makes it easy for his wife to tend the plants and he says he has almost no weeds. I really like it when something useful can be made out of junk that is free or near free. Thanks John. I can't wait until the fruit trees start producing. My wife practically lives on tomato and cucumber salad during the summer. With 21 cucumber plants (hey...I had the room and we did not have enough last year so I went a little crazy) and the other various things we grew, our grocery bill has shrunk considerably.